Dominoes Activity 

Student Page


Teacher Lesson Plan

Part I

In an introductory activity your group will receive the following materials:
  1. 2 grid sheets (one for each pair of students)
  2. 30 dominoes (15 for each pair of students) or print and cut out these paper dominoes
  3. Scissors (if necessary)
  4. Recording sheet for discussion questions

Work in pairs within your group to

show if it is possible to cover the 6X5 grid with your dominoes.

Take the time given to thoroughly complete the task.

Compare answers with the other people in your group.

  1. Did everyone have the same answer?
  2. If yes, can you find more than one answer?
  3. If no, how many possible answers there are?
  4. Describe how the dominoes cover the grid.
  5. Use the terms vertical and horizontal in your description.

Part II

Materials for each group of 4 students include:
  1. 4 sheets of graph paper
  2. 30 dominoes or print and cut out these paper dominoes
  3. Scissors (if necessary)
Go here to read the task As your group investigates this problem each student records the diagram, process, and solution. There is a pattern that emerges as you investigate this problem. For an explanation see: A pictorial representation of the pattern

Use your findings to create a Brick-Wall catalogue including:

  1. A title for the company
  2. Sketches of the possible wall designs
  3. An explanation of how to figure out how many possible designs there are for each certain number of bricks to be used before repeating the design.

Part III

There are many sites on the web with more information on polyominoes. Come in the morning or after school when you have time to explore some of these sites.

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