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Graphing Linear Equations
by Suzanne Alejandre

As I am learning to use the ImagiGraph program on my Zire 71 palmOne handheld, I started thinking that it might be fun to write directions similar to the ClarisWorks directions I wrote for my students several years ago called Graphing Linear Functions. These won't be useful, in my opinion, until they're classroom tested, so please consider them as a draft at this point!

The following steps can be used with students to have them create, investigate, and learn about graphs of linear equations.

[getting ready] ||  [define an equation] ||  [view graph]
[change slope and y-intercept] ||  [view data table]

Getting Ready

Step One

Locate the ImagiGraph icon. Tap it.

Note: If you don't have a copy of ImagiGraph on your handheld, you can download the ImagiMath Demo from the ImagiWorks site.

 

Step Two

Using your stylus, tap the menu in the upper right corner of the screen and select New.

 

Step Three

A window appears, Name Workspace.

To type a name, tap ABC (the red arrow is indicating the position of the ABC).

 

Step Four

A keyboard appears.

Use the stylus to tap on the keyboard.
Once you have named the new workspace (example: linear equations), tap Done and then on the next screen, tap OK.

 

Step Five

You are in your ImagiGraph Workspace titled linear equations.

You have a screen with two "No Equation Selected" lines and a grid displaying the x and y axes.

Use your stylus to
    zoom in -
    zoom out -
    move around - drag the stylus on the screen

 

Now that you are familiar with how you can adjust
the display of the grid, let's define an equation.
Go to: define an equation

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Send comments to: Suzanne Alejandre - suzanne@mathforum.org