29 August, 2014
Volume 19 No. 35
 
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In This Issue

Proof School

"Who Wants to Be a Mathematician" National Contest

Call for Speakers: HPM-Americas Meeting

 


Online PD

Free:
Orientation Sessions

Paid:
Problem Based Learning Courses

Graduate Credit:
Mathematics Teaching and Learning Certificate

Master's Degree

 

Proof School

http://proofschool.org/

An independent school "for kids who love math" plans to open its doors in San Francisco next September — and in the coming weeks, you can meet the people behind it, online and in-person.

Proof School will be a full-curriculum, grades 6-12 secondary school with a strong emphasis on mathematics, computer science, and related subjects. Yesterday, the non-profit posted a draft calendar outlining its inaugural 2015-2016 academic year. This first pass proposes two and a half hours of mathematical sciences coursework every afternoon, plus time for project demos, symposia, and "build weeks" to showcase a "making culture":

http://proofschool.org/2014/08/27/
2015-2016-proof-school-draft-calendar/

Proof School invites prospective students across the San Francisco Bay Area, their families, and anyone "just excited" about the concept to "sneak peek" meetings with its founders, leadership team, and board members later this month. To attend one of these mid-September previews in person, sign up here:

http://proofschool.org/2014/08/28/
proof-school-previews-new-sign-up/

On Wednesday, 3 September, the school's founders will get online for a presentation. To listen in, ask them questions, and chat with like-minded people in the audience, visit

http://naturalmath.com/mathfuture/
proof-school-for-kids-who-love-math.html

Next week's free virtual gathering is part of a series from Math Future. This international network has organized more than a hundred live online events on math education in the past five years:

http://mathfuture.wikispaces.com/events


"Who Wants to Be a Mathematician" National Contest

http://www.ams.org/programs/students/wwtbam/wwtbamnational

Who wants to be a mathematician?

Last year, more than 2,000 high school students answered that call by solving problems in a national contest that follows a game show format. Organized by the American Mathematical Society (AMS) Public Awareness Office, "Who Wants to Be a Mathematician" (WWTBAM) has challenged teens with algebra, trigonometry, geometry, and probability — everything but calculus — for over a decade.

Catch up on the fun from past WWTBAMs here:

http://www.ams.org/programs/students/wwtbam/archive-index

This year, the first round of qualifying starts next weekend, and runs through Saturday, 20 September. To request a qualifying test for your high school students, just e-mail the AMS Public Awareness Office, paoffice at ams dot org, with the subject line "National WWTBAM." In the body of the message, include your name, contact information, school, and courses taught this year.

Cash and other prizes come from the AMS, Maplesoft Inc., Texas Instruments, and John Wiley & Sons.


Call for Speakers: HPM-Americas Meeting

http://www.hpm-americas.org/fall-2014-wabash-meeting/

The Americas Section of the International Study Group on Relations between History and Pedagogy of Mathematics (HPM) and the Midwest History of Mathematics Conference (MHMC) recently announced a joint meeting, set for 17-19 October, 2014, at Wabash College, in Crawfordsville, Indiana.

HPM and MHMC seek a variety of talks on the relation between the history and pedagogy of mathematics. Submit your abstract by Monday, 15 September:

http://www.hpm-americas.org/fall-2014-wabash-meeting/
abstract-submission/

 

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