ESCOT Summer Workshop 2000
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ESCOT Summer Workshop 20000 || Math Forum Workshops
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Day 3 Summary

The Process -- Authoring, Testing, Posting
Jeremy presented a new model for the process of authoring and posting problems. This new model is meant to reduce some of the difficulties that occurred last year.
Problems: feeling of burn out, problems with implementation

Solutions:
  • Get more work done in workshop.
  • Post problems every other week instead of every week.
  • Define roles within the groups.
Discussion:
If this process goes well, we will think about how to include more people in the future. We will be able to recommend the process to other projects.

Is there a way to add notes to the working page? It could be a working document to keep track of what works and what is difficult.
We can address that later.
Nick asked the group to address the roles and level of commitment to help new participants understand what would be expected during the year.

Teachers had different experiences depending on the amount of progress that had been made on developing the problems during the summer workshop. Most people were aware of the "crunch" that hit a week or two before the problem was due to be posted. The face to face interaction between teachers, educational technologists and developers at the summer workshop contributed to easier implementation. Trying to communicate via email or chats was not as effective. It will be helpful to have an experienced ePOW person on each team.
Reviewing Problems for Selection
Jody presented the 16 problems discussed in the workshop up to this point, with ratings for technological implementation, uniqueness, defined question, standards and priority.
Problem Implementation Uniqueness Defined Standard Priority No. of Weeks
Graph zooming
Spinner
Pirates
Marbles
Search and Rescue
Scale n Bowl
Earthquake
Tetris
Pool table
Irrationals
Perimeter vs. area
Sprinkler
RPS
Shoelaces
Breaking a line
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
ok
depends/difficult
ok
depends
ok
ok
ok
hi
hi
med
med
hi
hi
hi
hi
hi
hi
med
med
med
med
med
hi
hi
hi
hi
med
med
med
med
med
med
med
med
med
med
med
Algebra
Data
Number
Data
Geometry
Number
Geometry
Number
Geometry
Number
Measurement
Geometry
Data
Data
Geometry
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
4
4
4
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
--
--
--
Working Session Task:
What is the question? What is the math?
What are the expected solutions?
Make a sketch of the problem.
Perhaps by the end of the workshop some of these will be ready for testing.
Collaborative Team Work
Graph Zooming
Leslie (teacher)
Vicki (educational technologist)
Jeremy (developer)
Bill (teacher)


Marbles/Spinners
Holly (educational technologist)
Mark (developer)
Wenming (developer)
Dave (teacher)
Alex (developer)


Pirates
Suzanne (educational technologist)
Gerri (teacher)
Seth (developer)
Chris (developer)


Search and Rescue
Nathalie (educational technologist)
Nick (developer)
Steve (teacher)

Group Presentations
Graph Zooming

Activity 1 (Spring Activity)
Students will play with the zoom buttons, noticing that the graphs look different in each view as the scale of the axes change.
Questions:
  1. What is the point of the intersection of the two lines?
  2. Notice when you zoom in you only see one line, because the scale has changed. Please explain how changing the scale makes the green line disappear. (Hint: experiment with different values of x.)
  3. Now graph a line. Experiment so you can see it when you are zomomed in. What is the equation of your line?
  4. Graph a line that will appear when you zoom in. What is the equation of your line?
Activity 2 (Fall Activity) In the dark with an elephant.
Questions:
  1. What are the values for domain and range that you found to make the working window look like: View A, View B, View C?
  2. Describe a strategy to make a curve look like a line.
  3. Using what you did in this POW, explain why people might have believed the world was flat.
Search and Rescue

This group wanted open-ended questions, wanted to build teacher support part of the problem, and wanted to make a microworld to give teachers ideas for more lessons. Activity 1

The activity involves using three applets.
  1. Applet 1 is to practice flying the device.
  2. Applet 2 let's students see a multi-stage flight plan.
  3. Applet 3 has no interactive controls, but asks the student to play the role of the head of a flight school. The student is trying to help a rookie flyer get home by deciding if the flight plan will work.
Question: Evaluate the plan. What are you going to tell this rookie?
Concern: Is the question to open-ended? Will it be difficult for mentors to check the students' work? Perhaps a tool can be developed for mentors to see if the student's advice gets the rookie "home".

Activity 2

The activity involves using two applets.
  1. Applet 1 is for touring a quadrilateral.
    How many paths can you find? Shortest? Longest? What if there's an obstacle (forcing the student to fly the diagonal).
  2. Applet 2 contains a field with 5 locations (dots). Come up with a flight plan that visits all the spots. What is the best flight plan for this?
Birds of a Feather
After lunch the group went to the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia and had dinner at Dock Street Brewery.
Wednesday, August 16, 2000
Written by Kristina Lasher

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