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Topic: A limit at a point means a function is continuous at that point,
but orangutans still don't get it!

Replies: 4   Last Post: Nov 10, 2017 1:36 AM

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bursejan@gmail.com

Posts: 5,239
Registered: 9/25/16
Re: A limit at a point means a function is continuous at that point,
but orangutans still don't get it!

Posted: Nov 9, 2017 10:49 AM
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Nope, then the singularity can be removed.
Thats the correct terminology.

Same for your new calculoose, where you
smoothen out:

f(b) - f(a)
----------- = f'(a) for lim b->a
b - a

Which is the same as:

f(x+h) - f(x) f(x+h) - f(x)
------------- = ------------- = f'(x) for lim h->0
x+h - x h

Nothing new on this planet. Maybe something
new on planet man boobs.

Am Donnerstag, 9. November 2017 15:57:06 UTC+1 schrieb John Gabriel:
> On Thursday, 9 November 2017 09:44:53 UTC-5, Peter Percival wrote:
> > John Gabriel at age 50. wrote:
> >
> > A function f doesn't even need to be defined at c for lim{x-->c}f(c) to
> > exist.

>
> Of course it doesn't, but if the limit exists, then the function IS defined at c.
>

> >
> > > There is **no limit** to e^(-1/(x^2)) as x approaches 0.
> > >
> > > The idiotic mainstream tendency is to transfer the limit to the exponent, that is,
> > >
> > > -oo = Lim_{x \to 0} -1/(x^2)
> > >
> > > in which case we say there is no limit because -oo is NOT a limit.
> > >
> > > Then what do orangutans do? They say:
> > >
> > > 0=e^(-oo)
> > >
> > > treating infinity exactly as if it were a number. Chuckle. I wonder ... does the limit operator jump back and forth between the exponent and e ....
> > >
> > > As I've stated in the past and continue to state, you cannot have a HOLE in a function at a point c in an interval (a,b) if the function is continuous on the interval and has a limit at c. The bogus mainstream calculus NEEDS holes, but even then, it needs a lot more decrees to stay afloat.
> > >
> > > Therefore, the function e^(-1/(x^2)) has NO limit at x=0 otherwise it would be continuous at x=0.
> > >
> > > And you thought Swiss cheese was holey eh?!
> > >
> > > Wolfram computational engine states that the limit is 0. Tsk, tsk. Idiots...
> > >
> > > Eat shit and die Mr. Penis Messager (Jean Pierre Messager / alias Python).
> > >

> >
> >
> > --
> > Do, as a concession to my poor wits, Lord Darlington, just explain
> > to me what you really mean.
> > I think I had better not, Duchess. Nowadays to be intelligible is
> > to be found out. -- Oscar Wilde, Lady Windermere's Fan






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