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Topic: A limit at a point means a function is continuous at that point,
but orangutans still don't get it!

Replies: 1   Last Post: Nov 9, 2017 8:12 PM

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Tucsondrew@me.com

Posts: 1,146
Registered: 5/24/13
Re: A limit at a point means a function is continuous at that point,
but orangutans still don't get it!

Posted: Nov 9, 2017 8:12 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

On Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 5:35:35 PM UTC-7, John Gabriel wrote:
> On Thursday, 9 November 2017 19:17:47 UTC-5, Zeit Geist wrote:
> > On Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 4:27:00 PM UTC-7, John Gabriel wrote:
> > > On Thursday, 9 November 2017 18:18:47 UTC-5, Me wrote:
> > > > On Thursday, November 9, 2017 at 1:50:03 PM UTC+1, John Gabriel at age 50.
> > > >

> > > > > Therefore, ...
> > > >
> > > > Ok, John. Now let's DEFINE the function f with domain IR the following way:
> > > >
> > > > / e^(-1/(x^2)) if x =/= 0
> > > > f(x) = {
> > > > \ 0 if x = 0.

> > >
> > > No idiot! How many times do I need to tell you that is NOT a function? I thought you understood, but evidently not. A function has ONE rule - according to the definition.

> >
> > You?re the idiot and a fucktard. Learn some math, already.
> >
> > A FUNCTION is a RELATION between two sets,

>
> Indeed dumb cunt! Did you notice RELATION is ***singular*** ???


Big deal.
Define the relation R on NxN as follows:
If x is even xRy iff x|y,
and if x is odd xRy iff y is even.

That Is a perfectly well defined relation. As in singular relation, you from donkey.

Fuck your one rule bullshit.
Play your games and be wrong. We don?t care; it?s your fuck-up.

ZG



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