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Topic: .073 acreage
Replies: 9   Last Post: May 27, 2008 3:11 PM

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Bob L Petersen

Posts: 525
From: My lawn show
Registered: 12/4/04
You can tell when and who by how
Posted: May 25, 2003 7:24 PM
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My first book on space was by Maxwell Hunter. In THRUST INTO SPACE
used feet per second. He gave one set of numbers that was very simple
and very useful. 52 minutes at 1G equals 100,000 feet per second.
When you start to design you need a starting number these were a good
start. The next simple number needed would be what is the bottom line
for efficiency usually in pounds of thrust per pound of propellant.
The number I wanted 8000; I end up settling for 2000 overall.



The A.I.A.A. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics put
out one of the books I had on design of rockets. They used pounds per
cubic inch for the weight of metals. The numbers they used for
comparison were only to 2 or 3 places or about 2.8 for steel and 1.0
for aluminum depending on the alloy. It was a very good book, on my
web pages I discuss the book more in depth. I do not know the name as
I never cared about the title as I did not plan to write about any of
this. I recently saw a couple of books from that series and recognized
the covers.


Space
is where I always wanted to be

Just off harmlessly putting along.
That is all one can really do.

http://www.lookingfora.0catch.com

Bob L. Petersen

http://www.angelfire.com/space/where-i-want-to-be


Message was edited by: Bob L Petersen



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