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Topic: Block Scheduling at High School
Replies: 1   Last Post: Jun 13, 1996 9:22 PM

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Anne Suk

Posts: 3
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: Block Scheduling at High School
Posted: Jun 13, 1996 9:22 PM
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thall@icsi.net (Andrew Thall) wrote:

>If teachers were lecturing for 90 minutes, then they had NO concept of
>what block scheduling is about! In order for it to succeed (we
>implemented it in our high schools last year), activities must be
>broken up into 20 to 30 minute segments to avoid boredom. I would
>lecture for 20-30 minutes, followed by desk or board work by my
>students. After that, I'd either re-teach the topic if necessary, or,
>go on to the next topic and give homework.


>Andrew Thall
>Laredo, TX


I agree completely. Having taught on the 90 block schedule at high
school for three years now, I love it in spite of the shortcomings.

In order to give the students a complete course, you must plan your
time. You cannot "wing" a 90 minute class.

The block allows flexibility to explore topics in more depth than the
traditional clss time.

The students like the fact that they have two days to complete
assignments on our schedule and can plan around activities or get help
after attempting the assignment the first night and complete it the
next.

I'm sorry to see the initial research is not positive, because the
students and teachers at our school (except for band and foreign
language) love this schedule.


Anne Suk
teaching in Kuna, Idaho





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