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Topic: 1996 National Meeting
Replies: 17   Last Post: Apr 14, 1995 4:00 PM

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Esther D Leonelli

Posts: 391
Registered: 12/4/04
Re: 1996 National Meeting
Posted: Apr 14, 1995 4:31 AM
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On Wed, 12 Apr 1995 Michelle@edc.org wrote:

> Not all the talks are about "pedagogical approaches." Often, it is
> teachers talking about what they do in their classrooms, authors talking
> about their books, and occasionally (*too* rare for my taste) talks on
> some interesting mathematics that is unfamiliar to most of the particiapants
> but accessible to students. (I saw a great talk on the Mathematics of Meanders
> at the Chicago NCTM regional.)


Michelle, I share your taste for "interesting math that is unfamiliar to
most of the participants but accessible to students..." Not being in
"academia", and in a basic math adult education classroom, I hunger for such
topics. For example, I thoroughly enjoyed listening to Norman Lott Webb
speak on "Fuzzy Logic, Assessment, and the Next Seventy-five Years."
I'd never heard of "Fuzzy Logic" and it was fascinating to hear of this
relatively new field of algebra set theory (30 years) that is used more
outside this country (particularly in Japanese electronic control industry)
than in the United States.

Esther
________________________________________________
Esther D. Leonelli <edl@world.std.com>
Community Learning Center, 19 Brookline Street, Cambridge, MA 02139
617-349-6363 Fax: 617-349-6339






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