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Topic: RE: manipulatives
Replies: 2   Last Post: Apr 17, 1995 2:15 PM

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Dr. Susan Addington

Posts: 21
Registered: 12/6/04
RE: manipulatives/graphing
Posted: Apr 11, 1995 9:43 PM
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Here come the worms!

Dan, have you ever taken calculus? People who don't understand
graphs sink like rocks in calculus. Most publications in science
are full of graphs, and in economics and other social sciences, too.
Graphs are the lingua franca of most modern technical information,
no matter what the field.

I agree that some uses of graphing calculators
are faddish (e.g., believing that the calculator will tell you the truth
in all cases) but graphs themselves are here to stay.

Susan Addington (addington@gallium.csusb.edu)
Math Department, California State University
San Bernardino, CA 92407
World Wide Web: http://www.math.csusb.edu/


On Tue, 11 Apr 1995 DKier@aol.com wrote:

>
> Now to attempt to open a can of worms. I also think that the current
> emphasis on graphing is a fad. The availability of cheap and powerful
> graphing calculators is a driving force behind this fad. I don't use graphs
> as a major way of learning or visualizing. I very seldom draw a graph to help
> me see what is going on. I think there are a lot of learners out there who
> don't need graphs to help them learn. Graphs and graphing calculators are
> another tool for learning that a wise teacher will keep and use when
> appropriate.
>
> Dan Kiernan






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