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Topic: What are the "basic" facts?
Replies: 20   Last Post: Jul 6, 1995 8:34 PM

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MCotton@aol.com

Posts: 90
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: What are the "basic" facts?
Posted: Jul 4, 1995 3:34 AM
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In a message dated 95-07-02 12:45:16 EDT, norton@moose.erie.net (Norm Krumpe)
writes:

>
>Considering the three basic ways of computing -- mental, paper/pencil, and
>calculator -- it seems that the one to which we devote the most attention in
>the classroom is the same one we use least outside the classroom.
>
>


Let me say that that statement depends upon what you do in life. As a
construction worker, I was forced to perform innumerable calculations in my
head or with a pencil on a daily basis because a calculator would quickly
have been broken in my tool pouch. Furthermore, I did not have the time to
pull out a calculator every time I needed to add a couple of numbers. When I
became foreman & supervisor, I found that customers inevitably asked me for a
rough estimate for a job when we were on the roof or some other equally
inconvenient place. Again, I had to be able to put numbers together in my
head. When talking to salesmen, I found that they too had to carry numbers
and perform rough estimeates in theri heads. Off hand, I would think that
construction workers, engineers, & salesmen must be able to do pencil & paper
math or mental calculations. These occupations account for a large portion of
our population.
marge





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