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Topic: Geometry Textbook
Replies: 3   Last Post: Mar 7, 1995 11:50 PM

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Angie S. Eshelman

Posts: 10
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: Geometry Textbook
Posted: Mar 7, 1995 11:50 PM
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While I have not taught from the text myself, I know of an informal
geometry text that has been receiving attention by folks looking for a less
traditional book:

Title: Discovering geometry : an inductive approach.
Author: Michael Serra.
Published: Berkeley, CA : Key Curriculum, c1992.
Subjects: Geometry.

Students develop/discover theorems through their work on the activity sets,
thereby "constructing" the Euclidean axiomatic system rather than having it
given to them to commit to memory. The book is full of non-routine
problems, practical applications, hands-on activities, and is replete with
diagrams, illustrations and humorous story-problem situations. A
considerable amount of attention is given to Escher's work throughout the
book. (By the way, the book's author gave a major address at the NCTM
Annual meeting in Indianapolis last year. Perhaps others heard him speak.)

On Thu, 2 Mar 1995, Paul Swebilius wrote:
> We are considering a new Geometry textbook. We are using the Merrill
> "Geometry" Does anyone know of a better textbook for grades 10-12?


____________________________________________________________
Angie S. Eshelman
116 Erickson Hall Office: (517) 353-0628
Michigan State University E-Mail: eshelma2@student.msu.edu
East Lansing, MI 48824-1034
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