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Topic: tangrams
Replies: 3   Last Post: Sep 28, 2007 2:55 PM

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Mary Krimmel

Posts: 629
Registered: 12/3/04
tangrams
Posted: Oct 5, 2004 4:22 PM
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At 03:44 PM 10/2/04 -0400, you wrote:
>can anyone help???
>
>how do u make a pentagon from 7 tangram pieces??????



Here's another pentagon.

Labeling the pieces as in my earlier post, place sides of 1 and 2 together
oriented so that they form an isosceles right triangle. Now construct a
trapezium. (I think that's the word for a quadrilateral with two opposite
sides parallel and the other two sides equal but not parallel.) I have the
long base of this figure on the bottom. Start on the left with 7,
hypotenuse down. On the leg (right side) set the hypotenuse of 3. To the
right of 3 place 4, sides together. Then a side of 5 against 4, with the
other side continuing to extend the long base. Now place 6 against 5,
continuing to extend the long base. Place this figure of five pieces
against the hypotenuse of the original triangle, to extend the right side
of the triangle. The sides and angles of the resulting pentagon are 1, 90
degrees, 3/2, 45 degrees, 5*2^2/4, 45 degrees, 1/2, 135 degrees, 2^2/4, 45
degrees.

Again, please ask if the construction isn't clear.

Mary Krimmel


------- End of Forwarded Message




Date Subject Author
10/2/04
Read tangrams
Lindsay
10/5/04
Read tangrams
Mary Krimmel
10/5/04
Read tangrams
Mary Krimmel
9/28/07
Read Re: tangrams
GG

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