Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Inactive » k12.ed.math

Topic: help
Replies: 4   Last Post: Feb 4, 2005 10:54 AM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
WebMonster

Posts: 1
Registered: 1/25/05
Re: help
Posted: Jan 2, 2005 9:45 AM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

George Cox wrote:
> WebMonster wrote:
> >
> > Hello!
> > Is this a normal equation, or a diophantine equation?

>
> It is an equation that one must "do". Isn't that enough?
>


Hi, Ok I try to solve it.
So, we have an equation:
2x-4y=16

Now order y to the right side, and "anything other" to the left side:
0.5x-8=y

This is a simple linear function
[http://www.apaczai.elte.hu/~08amszbb/func.PNG]. Now make a product
from the left side:
0.5*(x-4)=y

Examine the domain (D) and the range (R) of the function. The domain is
the set of real numbers, and the range is the set of real numbers
evenly divisible with 0.5. So there are infinity x values, because
there are infinity real numbers evenly divisible with 0.5, and because
of this, there are infinity y values, and because of this there are
infinity pairs of x and y values, and because of this there are
infinity solutions of the equation.

I hope I helped, my english is poor especially on terminologies
Bence Szasz


--
submissions: post to k12.ed.math or e-mail to k12math@k12groups.org
private e-mail to the k12.ed.math moderator: kem-moderator@k12groups.org
newsgroup website: http://www.thinkspot.net/k12math/
newsgroup charter: http://www.thinkspot.net/k12math/charter.html


Date Subject Author
1/2/05
Read Re: help
WebMonster
2/2/05
Read Re: help
Travis Horner
2/4/05
Read Re: help
Rob Morewood

Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.