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Topic: Jobs that use geometry
Replies: 7   Last Post: Nov 23, 2008 10:39 PM

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david

Posts: 1
Registered: 1/25/05
Re: Jobs that use geometry
Posted: Jan 24, 2005 9:23 PM
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I am a software engineer and I got into the field because of Geometry.
When I was in H.S. I learned how to do proofs, and I thought they were
fun because it was like doing a puzzle. You had some 'game pieces' to
play with that you put in the correct order to solve the puzzle.

The next year in H.S. I took computer programming, and found doing
proofs and programming computers to be very similar. The 'game pieces'
were different, but the concept was the same. So, I'd say that a
'software engineer' is a job that uses geometry. Do I ever use the
Pythagoras Theorem in my job? No. Do I use the skills I learned in
Geometry 'prooving' the Pythagoras Theorem? You betcha.

Are there other fields that use geometry in the same way? Sure.
Lawyers need to make arguements and write legal documents in the same
way that you learn to do 'proofs' in Geometry. They simply have a
different set of 'game pieces'. The same applies to virtually any of
the sciences or any job that relies heavily on logic.

For me, geometry wasn't about learning about circles, lines, and
angles and stuff. It was about learning how to think. Geometry taught
me to think in a very specific manner than I had before. This is what
I think geometry REALLY is all about.

BTW, this answer to your question is also an answer to some of the
educators out there who ask why they should teach proofs or if
geometry should still be taught in H.S.




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