Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Inactive » k12.ed.math

Topic: How to teach calculus
Replies: 1   Last Post: Feb 16, 2005 11:23 PM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
Jim Sprigs

Posts: 1,040
Registered: 1/31/05
Re: How to teach calculus
Posted: Feb 16, 2005 11:23 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

clemenr@wmin.ac.uk wrote:
>
> Hi. I'm curious to ask what methods people use to teach calculus in
> school. It has been a long time since I was in school, and hence I
> can't remember how I was taught. But, I cannot remember being taught
> any way apart from basically rule-based. I.e. if we have an equation
> f(x) = x^n then f'(x) = nx^(n-1).


Yuk, why learn "if f(x) = x^n then f'(x) = nx^(n-1)" without having some
reason to want to calculate f'? Start with problems such as "What is
the area under the curve?" or "What is the acceleration of the vehicle?"

>
> Can I ask how calculus is taught in schools these days? Do people start
> this way, or is it a matter of just introducing a rule such as the
> derivative of x^2 is 2x, and expecting it to be memorised?


Since there is no reason to memorize such a thing, why should it be
memorized?

> PS: I've noted some messages on this group bemoaning students'
> attitudes to maths.


Excellent! Blame the students for the failings of their teachers!

--
submissions: post to k12.ed.math or e-mail to k12math@k12groups.org
private e-mail to the k12.ed.math moderator: kem-moderator@k12groups.org
newsgroup website: http://www.thinkspot.net/k12math/
newsgroup charter: http://www.thinkspot.net/k12math/charter.html



Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.