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Topic: Math Word Problem
Replies: 2   Last Post: Jun 1, 2005 1:22 AM

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Jim Sprigs

Posts: 1,040
Registered: 1/31/05
Re: Math Word Problem
Posted: Jun 1, 2005 1:22 AM
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Gideon wrote:
>
> "Graduate students of physics and the like" most certainly do
> work on word problems. I spent some time in the past working
> in a research physics lab. Every research assignment I received
> was a "word problem."


I stand corrected.

> ==================
>
> Jim Spriggs wrote in message
> <428A7EE9.1C14931E@ANTISPAMbtinternet.com.invalid>...
>
> needmathhelp wrote:

> >
> > Does anybody know a math word problem that it would be impossible
> > for a fourth grader to figure out. I am a teacher in the gifted and
> > talented program in my school and I teach smart fourth graders. I had
> > to resort to placing particle physics in my lesson plans to get them
> > stumped. They understand string theory now. I need more hard stuff.
> > Please post anything hard.

>
> What are pupils who understand string theory doing word problems for?
> String theory is the sort of thing that graduate students of physics
> understand. Graduate students of physics and the like don't do word
> problems.



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