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Topic: Counting principles!!
Replies: 1   Last Post: Jun 1, 2005 1:22 AM

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Gideon

Posts: 13
Registered: 1/25/05
Re: Counting principles!!
Posted: Jun 1, 2005 1:22 AM
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You would probably help the student much more if you
gave him a few well directed hints rather than just solving
his homework for him. It is much more helpful to say
something such as:

Always attempt to break a big problems down into smaller
steps:
1) Try to determine how many ways you can put 5 of those
12 students into the first room.
2) After that, determine how many ways you can put 4 of the
remaining students into the second room.
3) Then determine how many ways you can put 3 of the final
remaining students into the last room.
4) The answer is pretty easy after you've done those three
calculations.

With hints, the student still needs to go through some of the
work and hence through some of the learning process.

=================

N. Silver wrote in message

E. Sanchez wrote:

> Twelve students are in the class, they are split
> so that five go to room A, four to room B,
> and three to room C. How many different ways
> can this Happen?


12 Choose 5, and then 7 Choose 4
(and then 3 Choose 3).

(12C5)*(7C4) = (792)(35) = 27,720.



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