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Topic: Frequency of Overlap
Replies: 2   Last Post: May 22, 2006 9:53 AM

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Gordon Sande

Posts: 695
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: Frequency of Overlap
Posted: May 21, 2006 9:51 AM
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On 2006-05-21 10:04:46 -0300, "millardgroups@gmail.com"
<millardgroups@gmail.com> said:

> Can someone please help me with a calulation that I can't figure out? I
> need to calculate the odds that commercial breaks will overlap on cable
> TV.
>
> Here's the situation.... cable TV networks offer local commercial time
> to cable operators. The local operators get two minutes every hour.
>
> Commercial ad inserters that can playback from one to five commercials
> at a time. These systems can monitor eight channels.
>
> Given that:
>
> There are eight networks being monitored
> There is one local break each hour on each network
> Each local break lasts 120 seconds
> You can only start inserting ads at the beginning of the 120
> seconds (no joining in progress)
>
> What percentage of local commercial breaks will I be able to cover
> if I have:
>
> -- One MPEG card
> -- Two MPEG cards
> -- Three MPEG cards
> -- Four MPEG cards
> -- Five MPEG cards
>
> I've tried to calculate this myself, but my statistics days are far
> back in college... I just don't trust my results.
>
> Thanks!


The impression from channel flipping is that the breaks tends to start
at the same time.

What does the real data say about when the breaks start? Or is this
just fancy homework?






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