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Topic: Logic
Replies: 2   Last Post: Sep 18, 2008 9:11 AM

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Alexandra Schmidt

Posts: 12
From: Hebrew Academy of the Capital District
Registered: 6/24/05
RE: Logic
Posted: Sep 18, 2008 9:11 AM
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I was checking in the Prentice-Hall and didn't see DeMorgan in the index...did I just miss it? The Amsco mentions DeMorgan really weirdly, on the intro page to the chapter but never in the chapter itself. I have been supplementing with the old Amsco Math B textbook, which is more complete on the laws of logic (except for their peculiar decision to call the Law of Syllogism the Chain Rule...). I like the Math B book's approach better because it does use logic to set the stage for the idea of two-column proofs, though it does contain a little more than is needed given the relative weighting of the topic in the overall course.

Alexandra Schmidt
Hebrew Academy of the Capital District
Albany, NY

________________________________
From: owner-nyshsmath@mathforum.org [mailto:owner-nyshsmath@mathforum.org] On Behalf Of msedfun@aol.com
Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2008 8:31 AM
To: nyshsmath@mathforum.org
Subject: Re: Logic

I got a sample of the Prentice Hall Geometry book, and I have to tell you that it is far better than Amsco. They do have De Morgan's law in it, as well as many other points that Amsco has chosen to omit.

Sharon :)
supplement Amsco with De Morgan's laws too.



-----Original Message-----
From: TKENYON@crcs.wnyric.org
To: nyshsmath@mathforum.org
Sent: Thu, 18 Sep 2008 8:01 am
Subject: Logic
Is there a name for the equivalence ~(p->q) = p ^ ~q ?
(pardon the equals sign)
Sample task G.G.24b asks students to write the negation of a conditional; I'm racking my brains, but I can't remember or find a name for that.

At first, I thought that G.G.24 only referred to simple statements, not compound statements, but apparently that sample task means students need to know the negation of a conditional. And, if that's fair game, then I suppose I'll have to supplement Amsco with De Morgan's laws too.

Anyone have any more insight into this?
Thanks,
-Tom
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Date Subject Author
9/18/08
Read Logic
Tom Kenyon
9/18/08
Read Re: Logic
Sharon
9/18/08
Read RE: Logic
Alexandra Schmidt

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