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Topic: Arthur Benjamin's formula for changing math education
Replies: 4   Last Post: Nov 27, 2009 10:06 AM

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Eric O'Brien

Posts: 38
From: Bellmore Schools
Registered: 9/19/08
Re: Arthur Benjamin's formula for changing math education
Posted: Nov 27, 2009 10:06 AM
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Bob,

Sorry that I let your message get by me. This was an important message, worthy of consideration by all teachers. While I do not agree with Benjamin 100%, the idea that we plod toward an understanding of calculus is something that has bothered me for years.

While making a bold statement that Probability and Statistics should be the final goal, I would rather guide students toward a fuller understanding of Number Theory as they work toward an understanding of Probability and Statistics. While "two standard deviations from the mean" is an important concept, so is the classification of numbers into subcategories, such as perfect, abundant and deficient numbers. So many nuances can be discovered when exploring various aspects of Number Theory.

I also wish to thank you for allowing me to visit the TED website. There are so many interesting messages in the archives of this website, and many of these offerings can prove vital toward the improvement of our teaching.

I hope people take some time to visit the website and share their views, positive and negative, about Benjamin's quote.

Eric O'Brien



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