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Topic: Social Promotion
Replies: 12   Last Post: Oct 18, 2010 1:23 PM

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Bishop, Wayne

Posts: 1,817
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: Social Promotion
Posted: Oct 8, 2010 11:01 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

Do I really need to force myself to use (;-)) for
something so obviously facetious?

Wayne

At 11:55 PM 10/7/2010, Jonathan Groves wrote:
>Wayne,
>
>What is so startling about that statement? If students aren't prepared
>for college by the time they leave high school, then their chances of
>doing well in college are not good. What frustrates me is that many
>high schools aren't doing their job anymore of preparing those students
>for college who want to go to college. That explains the high numbers
>of students I have had, especially at the University of Kentucky where
>I was a TA and where the student population was in general mostly young
>students who started there right out of high school and where older
>students were rare, who expected my classes to be like high school
>classes where they get A's for turning in their homework and showing
>up for class and for trying to do well on the exams. The fact that they
>believed their grades should reflect their effort rather than their
>understanding is a definite sign that their high schools did a poor
>job of preparing them for college.
>
>As for preparing middle school students for high school, I agree with
>that assertion. Preparing high school students for college is a much
>easier task if we begin with middle school. But we cannot ignore
>such work at the high school level either. If we prepare middle
>school students for high school but then those students are then allowed
>to slide through high school without learning much, then whatever work
>we did will be completely undone.
>
>
>
>
>Jonathan Groves
>
>
>On 10/7/2010 at 9:21 pm, Wayne Bishop wrote:
>

> > Here is some really startling evidence from Ed
> > Week, "ensuring kids are prepared for college by
> > the time they leave high school is the single
> > most important thing we can do to improve college
> > completion rates."
> >
> > I'm going to go way out on a limb and speculate
> > that a good study would demonstrate that ensuring
> > kids are prepared for high school by the time
> > they leave middle school is the single most
> > important thing we can do to improve high school
> > completion rates." Unadulterated social promotion
> > in conjunction with opposition to testable
> > academic standards has been SOP for long time but
> > maybe there's a better way?
> >
> > Wayne
> >
> > http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2010/10/act_
> > forum_on_improving_high.html
> >
> >
> > The High School Work of College Readiness
> >
> > By
> > <http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/high-school-connection> s/>Catherine
> > Gewertz on October 6, 2010 4:45 PM |
> >

> <http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2010/10/act>
> _forum_on_improving_high.html#comments>No

> > comments |
> >

> <http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2010/10/act>
> _forum_on_improving_high.html#recommends>No

> > recommendations
> >
> > Only a day after the White House Summit on
> > Community Colleges
> >

> <http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2010/10/hig>
> h_school_reform_100_million.html>made

> > me wonder if a focus on high school might be
> > getting lost in the commendable shuffle toward
> > higher education, the ACT convened a discussion
> > of its new report about­yes!­what is needed to
> > get high school students ready to succeed in college.
> >
> > The study, called
> > <http://www.act.org/research/policymakers/pdf/MindTheG> aps.pdf>"Mind
> > the Gaps," reminds us that far more high school
> > students say they plan to attend college than the
> > number of students who actually enroll. Cynthia
> > Schmeiser, the president of the ACT's education
> > division, told a gathering here in Washington,
> > D.C., today that the students who fall off the
> > college pathway typically do so because they
> > "have simply not had the same level of
> > preparation for postsecondary [education] as other
> > students."
> >
> > But "when kids are prepared for college,"
> > Schmeiser said, "college achievement gaps narrow in
> > remarkable ways."
> >
> > The ACT's research already had found that key
> > high school factors correlate with a better
> > chance of college success, such as producing
> > certain scores on its ACT college entrance exam,
> > taking a strong core curriculum, and taking
> > additional coursework in math and science. Doing
> > those things makes it more likely that a student
> > will enroll in college, hang around for a second
> > year of college, get good grades and be able to skip
> > remedial classes.
> >
> > So ACT's researchers decided to see how those
> > ideas could be applied to closing the racial,
> > ethnic, and socioeconomic gaps in college-going
> > and college-success rates. And they found that
> > those gaps could be narrowed substantially by
> > building a broader base of college readiness
> > among high school students. (See the section of
> > the report beginning on page 37 for this discussion.)
> >
> > Among all students in the class of 2007 who took
> > the ACT, researchers found a 14-point gap between
> > white students and racial minority students in
> > the rate at which they enrolled in college within
> > a year of graduation. But among ACT-takers who
> > met college readiness benchmarks in all four
> > subjects, the gap was only 6 points. Similar
> > gap-closing dynamics were found when researchers
> > examined the rates at which students re-enrolled
> > for a second year of college, got good grades,
> > and avoided remedial classes. This was true for
> > racial/ethnic gaps as well as for those based on
> > family income level.
> >
> > The study shows, Schmeiser said, "that ensuring
> > kids are prepared for college by the time they
> > leave high school is the single most important
> > thing we can do to improve college completion rates."




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