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Topic: Algebra 2/Trig Regents
Replies: 55   Last Post: Jul 1, 2011 6:01 PM

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ELEANOREVO@aol.com

Posts: 159
Registered: 12/3/04
Re: Algebra 2/Trig Regents
Posted: Jun 24, 2011 10:18 AM
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"I am very proud of them, especially the ones that got a 70 when they can't even
multiply single digit numbers without a calculator."
What a joke...I would not want anyone working for me that could not calculate
simple functions without using a calculator.



When I attend workshops and the topic comes up, I usually point out that I have poor vision. You can give me remedial classes. You can give me extra homework. You can give me keep me after school. You can keep me going to lunch. My eyes aren't going to change. It's a physical thing that you can't fix by punishing me. You can allow me to wear me a pair of glasses and I can do whatever everyone else can do.


Think about it. You are working with a 15 year old that has 3 years of school left, if they don't drop out first. Are you going to spend your 40 minutes a day drilling multiplication facts (If they haven't learned them by now, there is probably a physical reason. While they may be able to do them this year, they'll probably forget them during the summer and you can re-teach them next year.), or teaching them to THINK, with the aid of a $2.00 calculator.


The usual question I receive is "What happens if they forget the calculator, or if the batteries are dead?" My response is "The same that happens to me if I drop my glasses and they break. I'm SOL, so I learn to be responsible to take good care of my glasses. I also learn to have a spare pair in a convenient location."


BTW, I also believe that there are many ways to teach a student to think beside a college prep math curriculum. How about analyzing this chain e-mail ?



?This October has 5 Fridays, 5 Saturdays and 5 Sundays all in one month. It happens only once in 823 years.?
with 218 comments



Well, isn?t that an amazing little factoid? I read that on-line and did what everyone else did, passed it along to delight and edify my readers. And it?s posted all over the Internet, often with dozens of comments and jokes about how cool it is and how it?s a great month to enjoy the weekend and so on. And as I read on, as my astute readers may have guessed, I was soon pounding my head on my keyboard in amazement and horror. Is the average Internet reader so brain-dead that they believe the most egregious garbage if they see it posted on a website?
Apparently so. Let?s think about this, a year can only start on one of seven days, so there are seven possible basic calendar years. Add leap years, and there are fourteen basic calendars. Period. And one of those calendars only gets used every 823 years? How would that be possible? It?s not of course, all fourteen calendars get cycled through regularly, in fact 2010 uses the exact same calendar as 1999.That?s eleven years, not 823. The calendar above is a copy of an October 1999 calendar, not 2010. Now that my amazement is over, I?m appalled, though not surprised. I read literally hundreds of people?s comments related to this factoid, and maybe one percent of the comments were of the ?that can?t be right? variety. The other 99% of people who read it simply accepted it at face value. What the hell is going on here?
Well, for one thing, it?s clear to me that most people are all to happy to succumb to ?argument from authority.? Basically that means if they trust the source of some tidbit of information, they believe it. And apparently a huge number of people think that if they see something posted on a blog somewhere, and it doesn?t contradict their world view, it must be true. It?s hard to imagine the five weekends thing as being a threat to any particular religion, politics, or ideology, and that?s apparently as deep as most people?s filters operate.
I?ve been thinking a lot lately about how the Internet is changing society and people, and I?ve not been reassured. Other people have been thinking along the same lines: How the Internet is making us stupid and Is Google making us stupid? Both articles basically make the same case, that the Internet is promoting shallow thinking and multi-tasking over deep thinking and contemplation. And our brains are changing as we spend time online, reinforcing these changes. The second article makes the point that this isn?t the first time this happened. When public education was invented and writing became popular, scholars and thinkers bemoaned that people would become lazy thinkers and forgetful. When the printing press was invented, people had similar concerns, that the printing press would spread shallow garbage and make people less attuned to the great works of the written word. And while there was some truth to these concerns, writing and then the printed word did and do have huge benefits.
I can?t argue against the points raised in these and other articles and research, studies seem to show that lots of Internet use has a measurable effect on how people perform a number of tasks. One study for example had a class divided into two groups. One group used their laptops while listening to a lecture, the other half merely listened. And which group understood and retained the content of the lecture? The ones who didn?t have their laptops open. Basically the laptops were a distraction, this shouldn?t come as a surprise. I dunno though, there?s never been a real shortage of shallow thinkers throughout history, and it?s not exactly a revelation that paying attention is the best way to learn something.
So to some extent these concerns being raised are belabouring the obvious. Sure, the Internet makes it easy to be a shallow flighty thinker, but it?s not like people can?t concentrate and read articles if they want. I make a point of reading articles in their entirely if they look interesting, and my blog posts are getting longer and more in-depth. So if computers and the Internet were an ideologically neutral playing field, sure, they might promote some shallow thinking, but so what? It?s always been that way, and other people would be able to use the Internet to increase their understanding. So this isn?t quite what concerns me about the Internet. I?m more concerned with more widespread effects on our society, or more accurately how the Internet is being used to deliberately manipulate what people think.
The power of the Internet to sway the body politic so to speak. No one predicted the power that television would give to the advertising industry, it completely changed aspects of our society and industry in ways that are still unfolding. And the Internet is not only expanding on that, it has proved to be a powerful tool for any group with an agenda to spread its message and both influence and convert followers. Simultaneously both the largest governments and the smallest extremist group have a powerful new tool to spread their world view. Is this why elements of the US government want to restrict Internet access for Americans?
IDK, my whole point here, if there can even be said to be a point, is that the above illustrated tendency of people to uncritically believe something they read is a tremendous loophole in human society, and a lot of people are actively exploiting that loophole. It?s possible the calendar falsehood in the title may have been deliberately created to study how gullible people are and how to write a message that will be accepted at face value by people who read it. Yes, the Internet is allowing people to program society.
And that scares me.







Some people





-----Original Message-----
From: Deanna Tullison <moodydeanna@japan.com>
To: nyshsmath@mathforum.org
Sent: Thu, Jun 23, 2011 9:33 pm
Subject: Re: RE: Algebra 2/Trig Regents


It sounds like you just prepared them for the entire year to pass a state exam
(You just taught to the test)..if they were to go to college and take an exam
like that....or take a pre-calculus class in college; about half would most
likely fail....its one thing to brag that students COMPREHEND & RETAIN material
but, another when they just have been taught ONLY how to pass a regents exam.
As for the foreign exchange student who recieved a 100; you are not aware of the
education culture system in Asia...I am; I lived in Japan...they go to school 6
days a week from around 7 AM to 7 PM! They run circles around U.S. students
when it comes to math and sciences! That Alg. 2/Trig course for that student was
proably easy! The student most likely studied that material at a young age!
Also for the statment you made :
"I am very proud of them, especially the ones that got a 70 when they can't even
multiply single digit numbers without a calculator."
What a joke...I would not want anyone working for me that could not calculate
simple functions without using a calculator.
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