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Topic: How to I get Maple to spit out 1?
Replies: 1   Last Post: Jul 14, 2011 11:19 AM

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Evan24

Posts: 5
Registered: 5/29/10
Re: How to I get Maple to spit out 1?
Posted: Jul 14, 2011 11:19 AM
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On Thu, 14 Jul 2011 09:24:08 +0200, Axel Vogt wrote:

> On 14.07.2011 01:27, Salmon Egg wrote:
>> I already know the answer.
>>
>> If I get to an expression
>>
>> z := x*exp(-(1/2)*x)/(2*sinh((1/2)*x))*((exp(x)-1)/x)
>>
>> How do I get Maple to spit out 1? simplify does not do it.
>>
>> I looked at the help for simplify, and looked up convert and then See
>> Also. That looked promising, so I went to help on Convert. Convert had
>> a bus load of optional arguments. exp looked promising and worked, much
>> to my pleasant surprise.
>>
>> If I were even less knowledgeable than I am, how could I go about
>> finding a correct approach? Is it merely an empirical search? Is there
>> a guidebook? Suppose I had a much more complicated expression, say with
>> radicals and Bessel functions. Us there a cookbook approach to
>> simplification?

>
> For guessing I often just plot as a first step ...
>
> Difficult to say, though I would expect that Maple would try to convert
> hyperbolics to exp, as we would do, since other exp terms are present.
>
> The simplification problem is not specific for Maple, but it is a
> problem in any symbolic software system (thus I included
> sci.math.symbolic)


For what is worth, im Maxima 5.23.2, trigrat(z) gives 1.



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