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Topic: MIT Physics Riddle Solved
Replies: 25   Last Post: Jul 26, 2011 9:02 PM

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kirby urner

Posts: 3,513
Registered: 11/29/05
Re: MIT Physics Riddle Solved
Posted: Jul 24, 2011 12:52 PM
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On Sun, Jul 24, 2011 at 7:06 AM, Robert Hansen <bob@rsccore.com> wrote:

> Kirby wrote...
>
> "What's easy to pick up from his introductory remarks, in both the book and
> the lecture, is that the demand for physicists is flexible (variable), as is
> the meaning of what a physicist is."
>
> Can't have it both ways Kirby. You can't say that the demand something is
> variable and the something in demand is variable.
>


It's almost always that way Robert. The iStuff keeps changing yet we can
measure the demand for iStuff.

Stallman makes fun of the iBad (because it's so not "free as in open").

http://worldgame.blogspot.com/2011/04/richard-stallman-at-psu.html

Detroit changes the cars so you'll keep wanting the new ones, as upgrades
not just as replacements for the cars you drove 10 years ago.

Or maybe it's not Detroit anymore, since the Car Czar nationalized GM or
whatever it was. Or maybe now it's Detroit more than ever.


>
> The students failed physics, remember? Thus, your first part of you
> statement is correct, the demand for physics is variable. No need for
> useless and unproductive wordplay at all.
>
> Bob Hansen
>


Back to STEM, I keep getting the title wrong: 'How the Hippies Saved
Physics' by David Kaiser.

I'm not to the end of it yet. I photographed the book cover:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/17157315@N00/5970279017/in/photostream

Making some notes from last night's reading:

My friend Kiyoshi Kuromiya knew "the Unicorn" though I don't know how
closely.

Kiyoshi was a man about town in Philadelphia and close associate of Bucky
Fuller's.

He was a civil rights activist as well as a foodie who helped put
Philadelphia on the map by writing restaurant reviews (of 'The Fork' etc.).

I visited him in Philadelphia a couple times. Here's something I wrote:

http://www.grunch.net/synergetics/kiyoshi.html

He took me to the World Game offices of Medard Gabel and introduced me. He
was on his rounds, delivering some activist publication.

His name is prominent on the cover of 'Critical Path', which I was referring
to Haim re 'socialism' recently.

http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=7503208&tstart=0

That connection is less obvious than the Erhard - Fuller co-appearances,
like at Madison Square Garden.

Kirby



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