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Topic: SUPERLUMINAL NEUTRINOS AND TIRED LIGHT
Replies: 17   Last Post: Nov 28, 2011 1:54 AM

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pnalsing@gmail.com

Posts: 61
Registered: 4/17/09
Re: SUPERLUMINAL NEUTRINOS AND TIRED LIGHT
Posted: Nov 23, 2011 12:04 AM
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On Nov 22, 7:48 pm, "Androcles" <Headmas...@Hogwarts.physics.November.
2011> wrote:
> "palsing" <pnals...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:6ea1abb8-fb40-44b5-94a7-499a2a23e93c@g21g2000yqc.googlegroups.com...
> On Nov 22, 9:26 am, "Androcles" <Headmas...@Hogwarts.physics.November.
>
> 2011> wrote:

> > "Pentcho Valev" <pva...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>
> >news:f677cc69-4a8d-4e96-bac5-595905052383@h42g2000yqd.googlegroups.com...
> > | Let us assume that, as the photon travels through "empty" space (in a
> > | STATIC universe), it loses speed in much the same way that a golf ball
> > | loses speed due to the resistance of the air:

>
> > Rubbish! Photons are energy, they spread out over an ever-increasing area.
> > You need a big mirror to catch an old one.

>
> Depends on your definitions of 'big mirror' and 'old one'.
>
> I've seen the a and b components of Einstein's Cross, which is
> somewhere between 8 and 10 billion light years away in my 25" dob,
> under the excellent skies of west Texas.
>
> ========================================
> Your eyes aren't 25" across. You are catching 10 billion year old 25"
> wide photons with a big mirror and reducing them to pin points.
> Only you know what you mean by "excellent skies", it must be a
> local concept. How many skies does west Texas have, anyway?


=======================

25" wide photons? Really? I'll speculate that if everyone who believed
that were to be in the same room, you would be very lonely in there...

Agreed, only I know what I mean by "excellent skies"... but all my
astro-buddies would probably say that if you are going to see a couple
of components of Einstein's Cross, you had better have excellent
skies...




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