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Topic: How to find the area for two overlapped pattern?
Replies: 6   Last Post: May 3, 2012 6:14 PM

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Bruno Luong

Posts: 8,704
Registered: 7/26/08
Re: How to find the area for two overlapped pattern?
Posted: May 3, 2012 2:09 AM
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"Sheng Yuan" wrote in message <jnsnrb$off$1@newscl01ah.mathworks.com>...
> Hello all,
>
> I have a 60mm X 48 mm area with transmissive and absorbing little squares (1mm in x and y size), like a black and white checkboard (the white as sqaure as transmissive)
>
> I have another pattern which is an open circle (transmissive) with 3mm in diameter.
>
> I now overlap the two patterns (puting the circle at the upleft corner of the checkboard pattern) and drag the 3mm diameter circle accorss the checkboard along the 60mm long direction, in 640 steps, from one end to the other end.
>
> I want to know as I draw the open circle accorss the blank and white little sqaures, at each step, what is the total transmissive area (will be a single number) on the checkboard fall into the 3mm diameter clear circle I am draging?
>
> Anyone can help on how to do this coding in matlab?
>
> Thanks!


You can discretize the circle as a polygon with fine edges, then use tool such as this to compute the overlap area
http://www.mathworks.com/help/toolbox/map/ref/polybool.html

Then use polyarea() to compute the surface.

If you don't own mappin toolbox, you can find a replacement on FEX such as

http://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/36241-polygon-clipping-and-offsetting

Bruno



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