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Topic: Algebra Regents
Replies: 10   Last Post: Jun 21, 2012 5:56 AM

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Robinson, Carmen

Posts: 1
Registered: 6/18/12
RE: Algebra Regents
Posted: Jun 18, 2012 8:23 AM
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Greetings....
Monday morning always brings more to the day....
We too thought it was RIDICULOUS!!! The over meticulous kids were writing it as an ordered pair... clearly understanding where x and y were and what they meant...

Just a thought.... If they plugged in and showed a check does it fit the definition?
Since y ends up being zero with the appropriate substitutions in the equation?

And.... Maybe someone with a clearer memory can chime in on this one... didn't they ask for the y-intercept from a graph several years ago (perhaps in Math A) and NOT give credit if the kid didn't put it in an ordered pair?... I know I stress that the y intercept is an ordered pair and it's based on someone getting burned at one time...

Cant' wait until Tuesday and Wednesday!!!!
Carmen Robinson
Cambridge Central

From: owner-amtnys@mathforum.org [mailto:owner-amtnys@mathforum.org] On Behalf Of Ian Dunst
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2012 3:29 PM
To: amtnys@mathforum.org
Subject: RE: Algebra Regents


Hi everyone,



I also called to complain, however they referred to the state definition of a root as found on the glossary at: http://emsc32.nysed.gov/ciai/mst/math/glossary/home.html



Specifically, here is the root definition:


root of an equation (A) (A2T) A solution to an equation of the form f(x) = 0.

Example: A root of the equation y = 6x - 18 is 3 because when 3 is substituted in for x, the value of y = 0.

Example: The roots of [cid:image008.png@01CD4D2B.A48F9C60] are [cid:image009.png@01CD4D2B.A48F9C60] and[cid:image010.png@01CD4D2B.A48F9C60]. The equation is true if we substitute either [cid:image009.png@01CD4D2B.A48F9C60] or [cid:image010.png@01CD4D2B.A48F9C60] into the equation.

Even though this definition is pretty clear as to the need for the roots to be stated as a solution, the wording of the question is very misleading after referring to the graph for providing the answer.



Also, while we were chatting, she also stated that any intercept is the value as well, and not the coordinate. For example, the y-intercept of y=3x+5 is 5, and not (0,5). Who knows, maybe something like this might appear in the future, where semantics between definitions are used to catch students!



Have a great weekend everyone!



Ian Dunst

Director of Mathematics

Half Hollow Hills CSD

631-592-3190





-----Original Message-----
From: owner-amtnys@mathforum.org<mailto:owner-amtnys@mathforum.org> [mailto:owner-amtnys@mathforum.org]<mailto:[mailto:owner-amtnys@mathforum.org]> On Behalf Of Catherine Weaver
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2012 2:57 PM
To: amtnys@mathforum.org<mailto:amtnys@mathforum.org>
Subject: Re: Algebra Regents



We strongly disagree, but were told by the state that it had to be x =-4 and x =2. ii argued that students displayed understanding by locating the points on the graph.



Cathy Weaver

Math Teacher

Math Department Chair

Batavia High School

Email: cweaver@bataviacsd.org<mailto:cweaver@bataviacsd.org>

Voicemail: Ext. 7530



>>> Natasha Hazell <nhazell@gmail.com<mailto:nhazell@gmail.com>> 6/15/2012 2:47 PM >>>

Any thoughts about #34 on yesterday's algebra exam? Anyone agre/disagree with the rubric not allowing full credit if the student lists the coordinates instead of writing x =-4 and x =2?



--

-Natasha





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