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Topic: Are there any people on alt.global-warming who are interested in
having a rational scientific discussion about the meaning of the ratio of
warm records to cold records.

Replies: 5   Last Post: Jul 11, 2012 10:11 PM

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Bret Cahill

Posts: 243
Registered: 9/18/09
Re: Are there any people on alt.global-warming who are interested in
having a rational scientific discussion about the meaning of the ratio of
warm records to cold records.

Posted: Jul 10, 2012 4:35 PM
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> >> U.S. Daily Highest Max Temperature Records set in June 2012 Out of a
> >> possible 171,442 records: 2,284 (Broken) + 998 (Tied) = 3,282 Total

>
> >> I can cherry-pick better than you...
>
> > Even cherry picking isn't as silly as comparing the extremes from a much
> > smaller data set.

>
> > It's like the winner of the Tour of California bragging to the winner of
> > the Tour de France.

>
> > You're nonsense is good for a chuckle but that's it.
>
> Not exactly, 38125 measure points is a large sample, even if 172422 is
> larger.


4.5X more data points doesn't imply just 22% of the records of the
smaller data set. Depending on the standard deviation it may imply an
order of magnitude less records.

Instead the exact opposite is going on.

> The uncertainty on the bigger sample is half the uncertainty on
> the smaller one.


Why don't you try to defend that nonsense on sci.math and sci.physics?


Bret Cahill





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