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Topic: Excessive Equality
Replies: 13   Last Post: Sep 19, 2012 9:02 AM

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Paul A. Tanner III

Posts: 5,920
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: Excessive Equality
Posted: Sep 12, 2012 12:46 AM
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On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 8:27 PM, GS Chandy <gs_chandy@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Paul A. Tanner III posted Sep 11, 2012 10:33 PM:
>> education in the US public school system, the US now
>> has roughly 5% of its entire high school senior aged
>> population (and this includes all those not in school
>> or in vocational schools or whatever) take *and* pass
>> a national calculus exam covering an entire year of
>> high school calculus.

> <snip>
>>
> If correct, this is remarkable indeed, something of which I was entirely unaware. I also believe that most people are unaware of this fact. I too don't believe that there would be another country anywhere that could claim this.
>


I have been documenting this here at math-teach again and again. The actual numbers, roughly: There are now roughly 4 million people in the US of this age (high school senior age) and roughly 200,000 took and passed the AP Calculus Exam the past couple of years, where roughly a little over 300,000 took it. Almost half a million are in AP Calculus (some do not take the exam), and even more are in less rigorous calculus classes, maybe as many as a few hundred thousand more.

>
> Perhaps US public school educators might like to take up a 'Mission' such as the following?
>
> "To ensure that within X years, we have at least 10% of our high school senior aged population able to take up AND pass a national calculus exam covering an entire year of high school calculus"
>


In 30 years, that percentage increased from roughly half a percent to the present roughly five percent, an entire order of magnitude increase. As to how far this can go, we will see, but there is a "real world limit" that will start to put the brakes on things. But for now, the numbers keep moving up, although not as fast as 10 years ago.

> Now THAT would truly put paid to all those who, like Haim, are never tired of claiming the demise of the US public school system.
>


Deniers will always deny.



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