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Topic: [ap-calculus] point of inflection question
Replies: 1   Last Post: Sep 25, 2012 4:04 PM

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Floyd Brown

Posts: 62
Registered: 12/6/04
RE: [ap-calculus] point of inflection question
Posted: Sep 25, 2012 4:04 PM
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I tend to use the phrases "critical value" or "critical number" rather than "critical point" which student infer as an ordered pair which may or may not exist.

Floyd Brown
Mathematics Department







-----Original Message-----
From: Earley, Ned [mailto:Earley.Ned@lebanon.k12.oh.us]
Sent: Tuesday, September 25, 2012 7:28 AM
To: AP Calculus
Subject: RE: [ap-calculus] point of inflection question

NOTE:
This ap-calculus EDG will be closing in the next few weeks. Please sign up for the new AP Calculus Teacher Community Forum at https://apcommunity.collegeboard.org/getting-started
and post messages there.
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You can have a "critical point" without having a point.

Ned Earley


-----Original Message-----
From: Ed Eblin [mailto:ap.calculus.ecc@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, September 23, 2012 11:54 PM
To: AP Calculus
Cc: AP Calculus
Subject: Re: [ap-calculus] point of inflection question

NOTE:
This ap-calculus EDG will be closing in the next few weeks. Please sign up for the new AP Calculus Teacher Community Forum at https://apcommunity.collegeboard.org/getting-started
and post messages there.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How can you have a POINT of inflection where no POINT exists?

Sent from my iPad.

On Sep 23, 2012, at 10:41 AM, "Brett Baltz" <brettbaltz@msdlt.k12.in.us> wrote:

> NOTE:
> This ap-calculus EDG will be closing in the next few weeks. Please
> sign up for the new AP Calculus Teacher Community Forum at
> https://apcommunity.collegeboard.org/getting-started
> and post messages there.
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> -------------------------- I find conflicting reports on this, which
> leads me to believe there may be conflicting opinions or varying explanations among textbooks. For that reason, I assume this question would not be addressed in this way on the exam.
>
> Can a point of inflection be identified where the function has a vertical asymptote just because the concavity changes? For example does y=1/x have a point of inflection at x=0? My belief is that a point of inflection cannot exist at a point where the function is not defined or even not differentiable.
>
> The debate in my head has carried over into the classroom.
>
> Thanks!
> ---
> To search the list archives for previous posts go to
> http://lyris.collegeboard.com/read/?forum=ap-calculus


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