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Topic: Re: The Prime Directive
Replies: 11   Last Post: Oct 3, 2012 12:30 PM

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Paul A. Tanner III

Posts: 5,920
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: The Prime Directive
Posted: Oct 2, 2012 10:10 PM
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On Tue, Oct 2, 2012 at 9:31 PM, Robert Hansen <bob@rsccore.com> wrote:
>
> On Oct 2, 2012, at 7:52 PM, Paul Tanner <upprho@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Let's be clear: As someone who has a STEM degree, if I had it to do
> all over again, I would not major in a STEM major to do such as work
> for you even if I was one of these who took and passed an AP Calculus
> exam. Why? Money, money, money. To quote myself in my post above:
>
>
> But you weren't successful in the STEM field
>


I got published as the sole author of a research paper as an undergraduate math major. Look me up at Google Scholar or in the AMS Mathematical Reviews.

I was not successful in the STEM field because I chose to not even just try to work in the STEM field even though I had what it took to do so. (I do not consider k12 math teaching to be working in the STEM field.) I simply have had no interest to work in it.

The point is this: I have demonstrated again and again that there are more than enough people who are more than well-trained enough in math in high school or college to work in fields like yours but CHOOSE not to. Deal with it honestly rather than tell the falsity that there aren't enough people trained well enough in high school math to major in such fields.



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