Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Education » mathedcc

Topic: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific
Research - Response To Greeno

Replies: 12   Last Post: Nov 9, 2012 12:16 PM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
Alain Schremmer

Posts: 869
Registered: 10/10/05
Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
Posted: Nov 7, 2012 8:39 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply


On Nov 7, 2012, at 6:35 PM, Richard Hake wrote:

> I attempted to address the two crucial questions: (a) "Can Education
> Research Be 'Scientific'?" and (b) "What's 'Scientific'?" in a 75 kB
> post "Can Education Research Be 'Scientific'? What's
> 'Scientific'?" [Hake (2012b)] at <http://bit.ly/Ujaogk> containing
> over 100 references and over 180 hot-linked URL's, but, as far as I
> know, no *substantive* responses were forthcoming.



In a teaching-learning situation, there are (at least) four
constituents: the learner, the teacher, what is to be learned and the
evaluation of what has been learned. In most of mathematics education
I have seen,

(1) The learner is ill defined because we don't know how the learning
process proceeds and what conditions it. I am not alluding to
differences in intelligence which, in any case, do not seem currently
to be reliably measurable but to differences in previous educational
history, both global and local. I am thinking for instance of
Atherton's "resistance to learning" which I think is central to
education in two-year colleges. For instance, the differences in
resistance can be strikingly but unaccountably different among
students a priori "similar".

(2) The teacher is mostly defined by the procedures s/he follows. But
how these procedures are implemented probably varies depending on the
teacher, if only on the teacher's familiarity with mathematics "as a
whole" and that is usually not even mentioned. The whole issue of what
insights in mathematics the teacher may or may not have remains
unmentioned.

(3) What is to be learned is restricted to the mastery of a very
finite topic. The question of how much such mastery pertains to any
understanding of larger parts of mathematics remains unmentioned.

(4) The evaluation of what has been learned is more or less confined
to questions directly related to the topic to have been mastered and
never further down the line. How many studies are longitudinal? For
instance, developmental mathematics education is never evaluated in
terms of later courses. I follow some of my own students in
developmental and/or precalculus 1, sometimes for a year or two, and I
can often see that something I thought I had nailed is actually
missing as the student is confronting, say, differential calculus.
Here, for instance, is a message I recently received from a student I
had a year ago in Precalculus and who has now transferred to a four-
year institution where the student is taking Integral Calculus:

> Hello. I am trying to figure out the difference between u-
> substitution and integration by parts. I have noticed that some of
> the problems require me to use integration by parts. But for some
> reason I want to use u-substitution instead. Could you help me
> determine the difference between the two. Why can't I use u-
> substitution instead of integration?


When I think how much I harp on the necessity to focus on a precise
issue ....


The above response is of course not "substantive" but the fact is that
the only research that I have found relevant to what I am doing,
whether in developmental education or in precalculus, is Atherton's,
e.g. "Resistance to Learning: a discussion based on participants in in-
service professional training programmes" in Journal of Vovational
Education and Training Vol 51, No1, 1999. I say relevant because if
what is for sure is that students react very strongly to the change
from memorization of a few "how to do it" to trying to see why things
are the way they are, I do not know how to take it into tangible
consideration, how to make the switch more acceptable to the students.
And how to make the change a bit more lasting than with the above
student. Still, I have changed a few things in the materials I develop
as a result.

Regards
--schremmer



****************************************************************************
* To post to the list: email mathedcc@mathforum.org *
* To unsubscribe, email the message "unsubscribe mathedcc" to majordomo@mathforum.org *
* Archives at http://mathforum.org/kb/forum.jspa?forumID=184 *
****************************************************************************


Date Subject Author
11/7/12
Read Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific
Research - Response To Greeno
Richard Hake
11/7/12
Read Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
Alain Schremmer
11/8/12
Read Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
GS Chandy
11/8/12
Read Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
He, Jing Yun
11/8/12
Read Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
Alain Schremmer
11/8/12
Read Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
He, Jing Yun
11/8/12
Read RE: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
Blustein, Bonnie
11/9/12
Read Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
Alain Schremmer
11/9/12
Read Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
Alain Schremmer
11/8/12
Read Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
Clyde Greeno @ MALEI
11/9/12
Read Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
Alain Schremmer
11/8/12
Read Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
Alain Schremmer
11/9/12
Read Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific Research - Response To Greeno
GS Chandy

Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.