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Topic: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific
Research - Response To Greeno

Replies: 7   Last Post: Nov 9, 2012 7:31 PM

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GS Chandy

Posts: 7,028
From: Hyderabad, Mumbai/Bangalore, India
Registered: 9/29/05
Re: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions For Genuine Scientific
Research - Response To Greeno

Posted: Nov 9, 2012 10:55 AM
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Robert Hansen (RH) posted Nov 9, 2012 9:34 AM:
>
> On Nov 8, 2012, at 9:04 PM, GS Chandy
> <gs_chandy@yahoo.com> wrote:
>

> > If the 'fraud' by the 'Educational Mafia'
> (/'schools of education') is as "widespread and
> without deterrence" as you and the owners of those
> 'Missions' claim it is - then the simple and obvious
> 'THING TO DO' is to find better ways to convince the
> police and the judiciary of that 'fact', rather than
> thus ceaselessly re-iterate those bits of rhetoric.
>
> There is another choice that you have consistently
> failed to recognize. Recognize the fraud for what it
> is and take appropriate measures to avoid it. While
> your first inclination is to change the world, mine
> is to recognize the world for what it is. Yes, I
> would prefer that some of the most egregious cases of
> education fraud be dealt with like those that occur
> on wall street, but that ins't my first mission. My
> first mission is to see to it that my family does not
> fall victim to it all. Lou said, in a way, that the
> people get the education that the people want. And he
> is right. My answer to that is "Don't be like those
> people."
>
> Bob Hansen
>

I guess you "Recognize the fraud for what it is and take appropriate measures to avoid it" by perpetually shouting "PUT THE EDUCATIONAL MAFIA IN JAIL!" and "BLOW UP THE SCHOOLS OF EDUCATION!" - and then failing to put even a single alleged member of this infamous 'Education Mafia' in jail and failing to do any of the other, i.e. "BLOW UP THE SCHOOLS OF EDUCATION!"

And you have "recognize(d) the world for what it is" by participating in that futile shouting?

Good for you. My sincere congratulations to you for this wonderful accomplishment of changing the US education system.

I have a somewhat different take on matters: namely, that it is essential to look at the strengths, flaws and deficiencies of a complex system as dispasionately as possible; getting hold of the good ideas of ALL stakeholders; clearly understanding the good (and bad) ideas in their specific contexts; then working to implement those good ideas, by:

- -- making lists of good (and bad) ideas generated;
- -- understanding clearly the systems within which we function;
- -- constructing workable models to check out just how realistic and feasible are those ideas;
- -- checking out what can be implemented effectively (then implementing that);
- -- in general by working systematically to implement the good ideas that are generated (after evaluating them).

But it's your inalienable right to make the choices you prefer (whatever those may be). If those happen to be different from what's outlined above, so be it.

So, let's get on with:

- -- "BLOW UP THE SCHOOLS OF EDUCATION!"
- -- "PUT THE EDUCATION MAFIA IN JAIL!"

Do let us know how you get on.

GSC
("Still Shoveling Away!" - and with apologies if due to Barry Garelick for any tedium caused; and with the observation that the EASY way to avoid such awful tedium is to refrain from opening any messages that are purported to originate from GSC)



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