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Topic: When is a theory wrong? Action-Reaction investigates!
Replies: 6   Last Post: Dec 5, 2012 5:40 PM

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Paul Cardinale

Posts: 158
Registered: 12/13/04
Re: When is a theory wrong? Action-Reaction investigates!
Posted: Dec 5, 2012 2:49 PM
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On Dec 4, 11:15 pm, "G=EMC^2" <herbertglazi...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Dec 4, 10:50 pm, jdawe <mrjd...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>

> > Wrong - Correct
>
> > Constant - Variable
>
> > So, action-reaction tells us being wrong is an absolute constant. In
> > other words, if we are wrong we have nothing correct so we score a
> > zero.

>
> > Being correct on the other hand is a variable relative to absolute
> > failure. So the degree with which we are correct is variable.

>
> > Cold-Hot
>
> > It's like hot and cold. Cold is absolute zero whilst hot is a value
> > relative to that.

>
> > Wrong-Correct
>
> > Dark-Bright
>
> > Absolute-Relative
>
> > Linear-Curvature
>
> > Constant-Variable
>
> > Rest-Motion
>
> > Instantaneous-Gradual
>
> > Therefore,
>
> > Dark, Absolute, Linear, Constant, Rest, Instantaneous are all Wrong.
>
> > In other words,
>
> > Dark = Absolute = Linear = Constant = Rest = Instantaneous = Wrong = 0
>
> > So, you score zero if your theory is only made up of those words.
>
> > Bright, Relative, Curved, Variable, Motion, Gradual are all correct.
>
> > In other words,
>
> > Depending on the amount of these attributes we use is the degree of
> > being 'correct'.

>
> > -------------
>
> > So, if I propose Light is in a Constant Motion of 4444444343 km/h
>
> > I would score 0 for using 'constant' and 1 point for using 'motion'
> > because motion exists however 'constant' doesn't. So my theory is 1
> > point correct.

>
> > If I say,
>
> > Linear - Curvature
>
> > Cold - Heat
>
> > Decrease - Increase
>
> > If I propose a CURVATURE in a wire that has an electric current
> > running though it will induce an INCREASE in the degree of COLD.

>
> > I would score 0 for using the word COLD and a 1 point each for
> > CURVATURE and INCREASE.

>
> > So I would be 2 points correct.
>
> > I would of been 3 points correct if I had of said:
>
> > A wire with CURVATURE that has an electric current running through it
> > will induce an INCREASE in HEAT.

>
> > So, try and use the things on the left side in your theories as little
> > as possible:

>
> > Symmetrical - Asymmetrical
>
> > Microcosmic - Macrocosmic
>
> > Gravitation - Levitation
>
> > Contraction - Expansion
>
> > Absolutivity - Relativity
>
> > Space - Time
>
> > Whole - Particle
>
> > Continuum - Discrete
>
> > Fake - Real
>
> Theory is wrong when its a bad idea   TeBet- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Idiot. A theory is falsified when it is not self-consistent, or when
it predicts values different from those measured in experiments.



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