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Topic: THE WINNOWING OUT PROCESS IN PHYSICS
Replies: 4   Last Post: Mar 2, 2013 8:26 PM

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Pentcho Valev

Posts: 3,368
Registered: 12/13/04
Re: THE WINNOWING OUT PROCESS IN PHYSICS
Posted: Jan 1, 2013 9:49 AM
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Divine Einstein:

http://i.imgur.com/rwrnL.jpg

Isaac Newton and Neil deGrasse Tyson are both Divine Albert's apostles but Neil deGrasse Tyson is somewhat superior since he understands Divine Albert's Divine Theory while Newton does not.

Official Hymns in Einsteiniana:

http://www.haverford.edu/physics/songs/divine.htm
DIVINE EINSTEIN. "No-one's as dee-vine as Albert Einstein not Maxwell, Curie, or Bohr! His fame went glo-bell, he won the Nobel - He should have been given four! No-one's as dee-vine as Albert Einstein, Professor with brains galore! No-one could outshine Professor Einstein! He gave us special relativity, That's always made him a hero to me! No-one's as dee-vine as Albert Einstein, Professor in overdrive!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PkLLXhONvQ
We all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. Yes we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. Everything is relative, even simultaneity, and soon Einstein's become a de facto physics deity. 'cos we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. We all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity. Yes we all believe in relativity, relativity, relativity.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEyfr10lgNw
"That's the way ahah ahah we like it, ahah ahah!"

Pentcho Valev



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