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Topic: Interactive formula display
Replies: 6   Last Post: Jan 8, 2013 11:45 PM

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Posts: 69
Registered: 9/1/11
Re: Interactive formula display
Posted: Jan 3, 2013 8:33 AM
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"Cosmic Interloper" wrote in
news:f60d06ae-8e8c-4b9a-9386-c286b466a364@googlegroups.com...
> Hello
> I am searching for either an (html standards based) implementation of or
> expert advice on creating a method of displaying math formulas in a manner
> that when you hover the mouse over symbols in the formula a mouse over
> popup is displayed explaining that symbol context.
> example:
> http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/f/2/f/f2f955a43ad73b9d7da53126a5a39a93.png
> I think this would go far (especially in Wikipedia) in helping the layman
> understand formula from different disciplines where symbols can have
> alternate meanings.


On a website, written e.g. in HTML, you could use e.g. JavaScript. But I
think you have to present your symbol in an extra picture that starts an
action if the mouse hovers over this picture. Maybe JavaScript is also able
to start an action if the mouse hovers over a specified area/region of the
website. At the moment, I see two possibilities for the action: JavaScript
could open a new picture with the explanation of the symbol, or it could
open a small new window (popup) with the explanation of the symbol.
Maybe you can include TEX or MathML in your website. But at the moment I
don't know if or how JavaScript can interact with TEX or MathML.






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