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Topic: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
Replies: 29   Last Post: Jan 8, 2013 10:21 PM

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forbisgaryg@gmail.com

Posts: 43
Registered: 11/26/12
Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
Posted: Jan 8, 2013 10:21 PM
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On Tuesday, January 8, 2013 6:18:30 PM UTC-8, Kiru Sengal wrote:
> On Monday, January 7, 2013 6:39:50 AM UTC-5, JT wrote:
>

> > On 7 Jan, 07:17, forbisga...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> >
>
> > > On Sunday, January 6, 2013 7:32:45 PM UTC-8, JT wrote:
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> >
>
> > > > No a dynamic alloc memory pointer solution using a binary tree will
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> >
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> > > > not have any empty indeces.
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> >
>
> > >
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> >
>
> > > Why do you think I pointed you at the page for the binary insertion sort?
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> >
>
> > > How do you pass through the binary tree without comparisons?  Even if you
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> >
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> > > do dynamic leveling it takes time and the results will depend upon the order
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> >
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> > > in the "unordered" set.
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> >
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> > >
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> >
>
> > > The old Burroughs DMSII database supported ISAM, B-tree, and hash access
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> >
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> > > methods to retrieve data.  Each had their place.  Hash was by far the fastest
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> >
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> > > access as long as one didn't have too many overflow pages but it wasn't very
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> >
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> > > good for sequential access of the data and the data wasn't ordered other than
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> >
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> > > by hash algorithm.
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> >
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> > >
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> >
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> > > It's interesting that SQLServer seems to handle ordered insertion into
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> >
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> > > a b-tree much faster than the Unisys DMSII did.  It seems to keep more
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> >
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> > > information lying around.  Maybe it just keeps more of the index in memory.
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> >
>
> > > Back in the day 64K was a lot of memory, now we're thowing 10s of G at
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> >
>
> > > machines.  I don't really know and don't care as long as the results
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> >
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> > > are satisfactorally fast.  I can import millions of records in a few
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> >
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> > > minutes and that's good enough.  I can keep several indexes on huge
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> >
>
> > > tables and get the data back out very quickly.  That's good enough for
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> >
>
> > > me.  I don't care to know the specifics of the system's internals unless
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> >
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> > > performance is suffering.
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> >
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> > >
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> >
>
> > > You don't know what you're talking about.  You talk like a beginner.
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> >
>
> > > I don't like responding this way to anyone because I don't like being
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> >
>
> > > responded to this way by anyone.  Everyone's a beginner at something.
>
> >
>
> > > Go read up on sorts then try writing your own.  You're not up to speed
>
> >
>
> > > on the basics yet.  There's nothing worse than a rude beginner.
>
> >
>
> > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorting_algorithm#Counting_sort
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> >
>
> > Counting sort
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> >
>
> > Main article: Counting sort
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> >
>
> > Counting sort is applicable when each input is known to belong to a
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> >
>
> > particular set, S, of possibilities. The algorithm runs in O(|S| + n)
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> >
>
> > time and O(|S|) memory where n is the length of the input. It works by
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> >
>
> > creating an integer array of size |S| and using the ith bin to count
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> >
>
> > the occurrences of the ith member of S in the input. Each input is
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> >
>
> > then counted by incrementing the value of its corresponding bin.
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> >
>
> > Afterward, the counting array is looped through to arrange all of the
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> >
>
> > inputs in order. This sorting algorithm cannot often be used because S
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> >
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> > needs to be reasonably small for it to be efficient, but the algorithm
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> >
>
> > is extremely fast and demonstrates great asymptotic behavior as n
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> >
>
> > increases. It also can be modified to provide stable behavior.
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> >
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> >
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> >
>
> > ***So as you can see the implementation of this algoritm that i showed
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> >
>
> > to numbnuts work in index style, by first counting occurences this
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> >
>
> > means comparissons and have restrictions upon setsize(unique members)
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> >
>
> > due to memory restrictions, and they ***will also have to sort those
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> >
>
> > members after they have been counted in*** to their respective indexes
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> >
>
> > in array. And this is very bad if all values have low number of
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> >
>
> > occurences.
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> >
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> >
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> >
>
> > As you can see my pet array algorithm do no such thing because it just
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> >
>
> > use the array index so there will be no sort needed. Now the pet array
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> >
>
> > algorithm of course have it weakness that possibly no more then 2^20
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> >
>
> > elements can be created in most programming languages, this means
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> >
>
> > without index approach only elements of max 2.5 character could be
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> >
>
> > stored.
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> >
>
> > And that would not be much use for sorting text (unless you chose the
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> >
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> > index solution).
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> >
>
> >
>
> >
>
> > However a recursive pointer solution with digit branches do not need
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> >
>
> > to allocate slots for null values so would not need to have any
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> >
>
> > restrictions upon size of elements as long there is system memory to
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> >
>
> > store each unique value and the occurences of it, so basicly anything
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> >
>
> > can be indexed without any sort needed.
>
>
>
> Can you prove that quicksort won't beat your algorithm like a drum on random input instances?
>
>
>
> Benchmark it.


On the dataset he gave in another post it will beat quicksort.
Or so I believe. "Cherry picked" comes to mind. There is a
narrow band of datasets where his algorithm will beat quicksort.



Date Subject Author
1/5/13
Read Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/5/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
David Bernier
1/5/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/5/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
forbisgaryg@gmail.com
1/5/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/5/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
Scott Berg
1/5/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/5/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
forbisgaryg@gmail.com
1/6/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/6/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/6/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
forbisgaryg@gmail.com
1/6/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/6/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
forbisgaryg@gmail.com
1/6/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/6/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/7/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
forbisgaryg@gmail.com
1/7/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/7/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
forbisgaryg@gmail.com
1/7/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/7/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/7/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/7/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/7/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/8/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
kiru.sengal@gmail.com
1/8/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
forbisgaryg@gmail.com
1/5/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/6/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
UpChunky
1/6/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/6/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT
1/5/13
Read Re: Just finished the fastest ever, general purpose sorting algorithm.
JT

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