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Topic: Why is Warped Space Important?
Replies: 1   Last Post: Jan 26, 2013 11:48 PM

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Posts: 821
Registered: 9/1/10
Re: Why is Warped Space Important?
Posted: Jan 26, 2013 11:48 PM
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On Jan 26, 8:21 pm, Hetware <hatt...@speakyeasy.net> wrote:
> On 1/26/2013 4:18 PM, Kevin wrote:
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> > Spiral structures are under frame shifting given boundary value
> > problems... I have folding dimentions by the short hairs if I apply
> > myself to warped space? Well, if that is the case then don't insult me
> > with a job offer for less than 50K a year... I'm too old to work for
> > peanuts. I have folding dimentions by the short hairs by default...
> > Really, what it amounts to is that one has to be under fusion to be
> > under cold fusion... 'k, well, I'm under fusion, but premise for cold
> > fusion is contrived without my knot theory... There has to be premise
> > for warped space, otherwise, there is no premise for cold fusion...
> > You don't have premise for warped space if you think that folding
> > dimentions amounts to anything... I quess some quantum type thinks
> > that folding dimentions and cold fusion proves the split in their
> > equations... I don't think splitting equations works like that. What
> > does work is to build a better scanning tunneling electron microscope
> > based on my knots if you ever want premise for cold fusion.

>
> LSD is back on the market?

No. Yes, because you said it was. Musatov



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