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Topic: My amateurview of math.
Replies: 27   Last Post: Feb 10, 2013 2:56 AM

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JT

Posts: 1,148
Registered: 4/7/12
Re: My amateurview of math.
Posted: Feb 1, 2013 4:54 AM
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On 1 Feb, 10:40, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
> On 1 Feb., 09:59, "christian.bau" <christian....@cbau.wanadoo.co.uk>
> wrote:
>

> > On Feb 1, 8:51 am, JT <jonas.thornv...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > > > Well just my few thoughts around numbers.
>
> > Go to your bathroom.
> > Count how many elephants there are.
> > How many? The answer is zero.

>
> > If you watch an elephant leaving your bathroom, how many elephants are
> > in the bathroom then?
> > There were none, then one left, so now there are minus one elephants
> > in your bathroom.

>
> So -1 must ve a natural number too?
>
> Regards, WM


Well honestly i never understood the distinction for me there is only
natural discrete counting entities used for counting, you can group
them in sets and partition them in bases. And then there is fractions
of naturals that you also can partition using bases, any fraction can
use the form 1/x? But when you move to bases and partition the
discrete natural you may find that values like 1/3 not possible to
give a natural representation.
But using zeroless base systems this awkward feature of the standard
number system with unfinished digit expansions is gone.

I think it is no more then 3 lines of code to erase it forever.



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