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Topic: Happy (Late) 90th Birthday, George Spencer Brown!
Replies: 9   Last Post: Mar 4, 2013 8:52 PM

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Mike

Posts: 108
Registered: 12/20/08
Re: Happy (Late) 90th Birthday, George Spencer Brown!
Posted: Feb 20, 2013 12:46 PM
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On Feb 20, 8:00 am, mimus <mimu...@gmail.com> wrote:
> In 1969, George Spencer Brown (abbreviated among the cognoscenti as
> ?GSB?) published _ Laws of Form _ (abbreviated among the cognoscenti
> as ?LoF?), the classic and exhaustive study of the simplest possible
> analysis, involving two indexes or indices and transition between
> those indices, providing an elegant and powerful calculus for such
> analysis; extending it to the corresponding binary arithmetic and
> algebra; treating questions both fundamental and advanced about such
> analysis, calculus, arithmetic and algebra; and applying that algebra
> in Appendix 2 to the binary resolution or analysis of propositional
> logical arguments and to set analysis.
>
> The book has gone through many editions since, and deservedly so.
>
> On the 4th of this month, GSB celebrated, possibly, his 90th birthday.
>
> Happy (Late) 90th Birthday, GSB!
>
> http://www.omath.org.il/Unity-of-mathematics.html
>
> --
>
> Someone had to do it.
>
> < GSB's reason for writing LoF


Duality might be an artifact of our consciousness.

"...the first distinction, the Mark and the observer are not only
interchangeable, but, in the form, identical."

However science requires objective observations.

http://www.dailyprincetonian.com/2013/02/18/32776/

"Rather than validating existing mathematical models with experimental
data, Bondar uses the data to derive the equations."



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