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Topic: deriving the 0.5 MeV electron and 938MeV proton rest mass #1251 New
Physics #1371 ATOM TOTALITY 5th ed

Replies: 4   Last Post: Feb 24, 2013 5:17 AM

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plutonium.archimedes@gmail.com

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Registered: 3/31/08
deriving the 0.5 MeV electron and 938MeV proton rest mass #1251 New
Physics #1371 ATOM TOTALITY 5th ed

Posted: Feb 22, 2013 3:43 PM
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Alright, let me put some math to this rest-mass.
I like the idea that rest-mass is where a wavefront is curled back
around into a stationary wavefront and the trailing wave becomes a
kinetic energy of the curled standing wave.

So a photon is not curled and looks like this:

======>

as a Euclidean straight line, but a electron or proton
which are single transverse waves tend to have their leading front
wave start to bend and curl back around onto itself forming a circle
for the electron and for the proton forms a volume sack standing wave.

For the electron it looks like this:

=======O

And the proton looks like the electron only the O is a solid with
volume filled in of a standing wave.

Now, let me put some numbers to it.

The electron is 500,000 eV rest mass and the proton is 938,000,000 eV
rest mass.

The proton is a sack or ellipsoid or sphere and so volume is involved
and for a sphere it is 4/3pi(r^3).
The electron is a closed loop wire, a ring, or just the circumference
of a circle which is pi(2r).

I may need surface area of sphere which is 4pi(r^2) but looks like not
now.

I will need the photon with its ridges and troughs and since it is a
double transverse wave I have to realize the ridges and troughs become
ellipsoids, so I have to either double or take 1/2. For the electron
and proton they are single transverse waves so I count the ridges and
troughs.

So, what I am doing is counting ridges and troughs in the standing
wave of the electron as a closed loop ring and counting the ridges and
troughs of the standing wave of the proton as it fills the volume of a
ellipsoid. Each ridge and trough is like 1 eV of rest mass. So that
counting the ridges and troughs of the electron should add up to
500,000 and for the proton should add up to 938,000,000.

Now, we know straight away that the proton will have a huge rest mass
since it is volume geometry of a radius cubed and we know straight
away the electron will be a tiny rest mass in comparison because it is
a circumference of just radius.

So that if we look at the proton and pretended for a moment that its
rest mass were 1,000,000,000 which it is not far away from as is, that
we would instinctively know it was 10^3 cubed and we would then have
probably discovered this by 1930s rather than 2013 that rest mass was
the counting up of ridges and troughs of standing waves.

Now I have to use the ridges and troughs of the photon to derive the
proton and electron rest mass.

First I must work out a kink in this derivation, so will post later.
What I have in mind is have the photon travel similar distances of the
curled up electron and curled up proton in a volume dimension.

--

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Archimedes Plutonium
http://www.iw.net/~a_plutonium
whole entire Universe is just one big atom
where dots of the electron-dot-cloud are galaxies



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