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Topic: CHAITAN'S POWERSET!
Replies: 3   Last Post: Mar 6, 2013 1:24 AM

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Charlie-Boo

Posts: 1,582
Registered: 2/27/06
Re: CHAITAN'S POWERSET!
Posted: Mar 5, 2013 3:27 PM
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On Jan 16, 3:48 pm, Graham Cooper <grahamcoop...@gmail.com> wrote:
> INPUT  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
> =============================
> TM1    H L H H H L L L L L ...
> TM2    H H H H H H H H H H ...
> TM3    H L L L L L L L L L ...
> TM4    L H L H L H L H L H ...
> ...
> If TM1(1) Halts then 1 e POWERSET_1
> If TM1(2) Loops then 2 !e POWERSET_1
> ...
> If TM2(1) Halts then 1 e POWERSET_2
> If TM2(2) Halts then 2 e POWERSET_2
> ...
>
> 1 <=> {1,3,4,5,...}
> 2 <=> {1,2,3,4,5,...}
> 3 <=> {1}
> 4 <=> {2,4,6,8,10...}
>        | | | | |
> TM4   LHLHLHLHLH ...
>
> Instead of constructing an UN-COMPUTABLE REAL
> And using CHAITANS OMEGA to argue computable reals are UN-COUNTABLE
>
> YOU CAN CONSTRUCT AN ACTUAL SEMI-DECIDABLE
> POWERSET OF N!
>
> Herc
> --
> S: if stops(S) gosub S
> G. GREENE:  this proves stops() must be un-computable!


Chaitin is a total idiot and a fraud. Nothing that he says stands up
to formal scrutiny. Omega is not a constant. There's no such thing
as the probability of halting - it does not converge. (I proved that
on FOM.) When he gets into any details about Gödel or Turing he makes
mistakes. His "probability" was > 1 for a decade before he realized
it and changed it.

Chaitin and Codd are 2 of the biggest BSers in cs publishing. And
both were funded by the biggest money in the business: IBM.

C-B






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