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Topic: Can you translate from Sanskrit? Euclid's definition of
multiplication...

Replies: 4   Last Post: Apr 20, 2013 1:22 AM

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GS Chandy

Posts: 7,757
From: Hyderabad, Mumbai/Bangalore, India
Registered: 9/29/05
Re: Can you translate from Sanskrit? Euclid's definition of
multiplication...

Posted: Mar 14, 2013 10:31 PM
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Jonathan Crabtree posted Mar 14, 2013 12:17 PM:
> Dear GSC
>
> Thank you for your reply.
>
> Just as you wished you had learnt Sanskrit I wish I
> had learnt Latin.
>
> Even though a lot of my time is invested with Greek
> mathematics, Latin and Sanskrit are perhaps the two
> greatest academic languages.
>
> I am lucky to have found translations from Sanskrit
> to English online for the books written by:
> - - Aryabhata (Aryabhatiya)
> - - Brahmagupta (Brahmasphuta-siddhantas) and
> - - Bhaskara II (Lilavati).
>
> Best wishes,
> Jonathan Crabtree
>

Remarkably enough, I did very early on once have a year of Latin ("Amo, amas, amare, amavi, amatum", if I remember rightly!) when I had spent a year at a Jesuit school.

I must confess that it was a terrible bore for me those days - but I do believe it has considerably helped me with whatever skills I may now possess to understand/express myself in English.

I further believe that both Latin and Sanskrit would be most useful for many of us to learn - but the way they are taught and learned has to be changed very significantly. I doubt that this point of view will find much purchase amongst pedagogues at all!

GSC



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