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Topic: Coincidence of meteor strike and close asteroid approach at same time.
Replies: 7   Last Post: Nov 7, 2013 8:47 AM

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bradguth@gmail.com

Posts: 924
Registered: 3/16/07
Re: Coincidence of meteor strike and close asteroid approach at same time.
Posted: Mar 27, 2013 8:09 PM
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On Mar 27, 12:43 pm, bob haller <hall...@aol.com> wrote:
> On Mar 27, 1:17 pm, Robert Clark <rgregorycl...@yahoo.com> wrote:
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> > Last weekends meteor over the east coast U.S. was not uncommon
> > according to NASA:

>
> > Boulder-Size Asteroid Caused Friday's East Coast Meteor, NASA Says.
> > By Mike Wall | SPACE.com ? Sat, Mar 23, 2013
> > http://news.yahoo.com/boulder-size-asteroid-caused-fridays-east- > > coast-meteor-194918370.html

>
> >  It's estimated about 100 of these meter-sized boulders hit the
> > Earth's atmosphere every year;  this one was uncommon in being over a
> > heavily populated area. The fireball over the Bay Area in California
> > in February also was not an uncommonly large one.
> >  However, there may be a characteristic of the east coast meteor that
> > is uncommon, and that is its speed. It's been estimated to have been
> > traveling at perhaps 20 miles per second:

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> > Fiery meteor streaks across Massachusetts? night sky, seen up and down
> > the East Coast
> > 03/22/2013 11:58 PM
> > [Quote]
> > ?This is not nearly as big as [Russia?s meteor], not in a long shot,?
> > said Beatty. ?There?s a hundred tons of meteorite that hit the Earth?s
> > atmosphere every day. [This] was a large-ish object that may have been
> > the size of about a washing machine, approximately.?
> > Beatty said the object hit the planet?s atmosphere traveling northwest
> > to southeast at an estimated 20 miles-per-second, but it could have
> > been anywhere from 15 to 50 miles-per-second.[/quote]http://www.boston.com/metrodesk/2013/03/22/fiery-meteor-streaks-acros...

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> > East coast residents marvel at Friday night meteor.
> > Mar 23, 2013 5:32 PM EDT Updated: Mar 23, 2013 6:03 PM EDT
> > [Quote]
> > Beatty tells FOX 25 Friday night's meteor was traveling at a speed
> > equivalent to traveling from Boston to New York in about 10 seconds.[/
> > quote]http://www.myfoxboston.com/story/21776174/2013/03/23/east-coast-resid...

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> >  The distance from Boston to New York is 190 miles. The meteor was
> > seen from Boston to New York. Then fixing the time by video cameras
> > when it appeared over Boston compared to New York would give us an
> > accurate idea of its speed.

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> >  IF it really was traveling at 20 miles per second then that would put
> > it in an unusual category since that would put it at the highest speed
> > ever measured for a meteor:

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> > 64,000 mph asteroid was fastest on record.
> > By Brian Dodson
> > December 30, 2012
> > [quote]
> > At about 14:51 GMT on April 22, 2012, a fireball was seen throughout
> > the western United States, accompanied by a loud booming sound heard
> > over much of California's Sierra Nevada mountains around Lake Tahoe.
> > Scientists have now carried out a thorough analysis of the meteorite
> > and found that it was the fastest meteor ever recorded at 28.6 km/s
> > (64000 mph).[/quote]http://www.gizmag.com/sutters-hill-meteor-fastest-kiloton-radar/25552/

>
> > Sutter?s Mill Meteor Fastest, Most Diverse Ever.
> > December 21, 2012 at 04:57   Merryl Azriel
> > http://www.spacesafetymagazine.com/2012/12/21/sutters-mill-meteor- > > fastest/

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> >  A speed of 20 miles per second for the east coast meteor would put it
> > slightly ahead of the Sutter's Mill meteor which was at 64,000 mph,
> > 17.8 miles per second.

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> >  NASA is putting up a list of bolides, fireballs on its NEO web page:
>
> > Fireball and Bolide Reports.
> > http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/fireballs/

>
> >  So far it only has the the Chelyabinsk meteor on the list. I think it
> > should also include meteors of size as the east coast and Bay Area
> > meteors, even if ones this size occur a hundred times a year. Such
> > events may still have unusual characteristics that would be uncovered
> > by open dissemination of their physical aspects.

>
> >  The American Meteor Society has released an analysis of the number of
> > reports made to them by the public of fireballs over the last few
> > years. They conclude that while there has been a definite increase,
> > because of the increasing awareness and the technical tools to report
> > such events, no conclusion can be made about whether this represents a
> > real increase in the number of events:

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> > Fireball Tracking System Analysis.
> > Analysis of the AMS Citizen Science Based Fireball Tracking System.
> > http://www.amsmeteors.org/fireballs/fireball-tracking-system- > > analysis/

>
> >   Bob Clark
>
> Norad tacks stuff like this, it would be interesting if they released
> just a number of events per year.....


That might suggest our government agencies haven't always been telling
us the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Perhaps making our
oligarchs into unhappy campers is not such a good idea, because the
last time they made 911 happen and otherwise took down the wrong 747.



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