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Topic: BINGO THE EINSTEINIANO
Replies: 8   Last Post: Apr 11, 2013 11:38 AM

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Pentcho Valev

Posts: 3,421
Registered: 12/13/04
Re: BINGO THE EINSTEINIANO
Posted: Mar 29, 2013 5:58 PM
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Bingo the Einsteiniano often becomes professor but then he should teach two fundamental lies:

1. Maxwell's 19th century electromagnetic theory predicted that the speed of light does not depend on the speed of the observer measuring it. (In fact, Maxwell's theory predicted that the speed of light varies with the speed of the observer.)

2. The Michelson-Morley experiment showed that the speed of light does not depend on the speed of the observer measuring it. (In fact, in 1887 the Michelson-Morley experiment unequivocally showed that the speed of light does depend on the speed of the observer, as predicted by Newton's emission theory of light.)

http://www.amazon.com/Why-Does-mc2-Should-Care/dp/0306817586
Why Does E=mc2?: (And Why Should We Care?), Brian Cox, Jeff Forshaw, p. 91: "...Maxwell's brilliant synthesis of the experimental results of Faraday and others strongly suggested that the speed of light should be the same for all observers. This conclusion was supported by the experimental result of Michelson and Morley, and taken at face value by Einstein."

http://www.lecture-notes.co.uk/susskind/special-relativity/lecture-1/principles-of-special-relativity/
Leonard Susskind: "One of the predictions of Maxwell's equations is that the velocity of electromagnetic waves, or light, is always measured to have the same value, regardless of the frame in which it is measured. (...) So, in Galilean relativity, we have c'=c-v and the speed of light in the moving frame should be slower than in the stationary frame, directly contradicting Maxwell. Scientists before Einstein thought that Galilean relativity was correct and so supposed that there had to exist a special, universal frame (called the aether) in which Maxwell's equations would be correct. However, over time and many experiments (including Michelson-Morley) it was shown that the speed of light did not depend on the velocity of the observer measuring it, so that c'=c."

Pentcho Valev



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