Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » sci.math.* » sci.math

Topic: Matheology § 233
Replies: 20   Last Post: Apr 4, 2013 10:16 AM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
mueckenh@rz.fh-augsburg.de

Posts: 16,040
Registered: 1/29/05
Re: Matheology § 233
Posted: Apr 1, 2013 5:08 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

On 1 Apr., 17:05, William Hughes <wpihug...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Mar 27, 8:55 am, WM <mueck...@rz.fh-augsburg.de> wrote:
>

> > Matheology § 233
>
> > The set of all termination decimals is a subset of Q. If the set of
> > all terminating decimals of the unit interval is arranged as set of
> > all terminating paths of the decimal tree,

>
> It is, of course, impossible to write this out
> (there number of terminating decimals is infinite).
>

But it is possible to construct the Binary Tree according to this
method.

> > unavoidably all irrationals
> > are written as infinite paths too. But we know that it is impossible
> > to write the path of even one single irrational number, let alone of
> > several or infinitely many or uncountably many.

>
> Correct, it is impossible.


It is impossible to write them out. Yes. But they are constructed like
the finita paths. It is impossible to prohibit infinite paths (of
rationals and of irrationals) to be constructed when the complete set
of nodes of the Binary Tree is constructed by means of all finite
paths. Therefore it is impossible to distinguish infinite paths by
nodes other than be naming infinite sets of nodes. Alas there are only
countably many names available.

Regards, WM




Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.