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Topic: BINGO THE EINSTEINIANO
Replies: 8   Last Post: Apr 11, 2013 11:38 AM

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Pentcho Valev

Posts: 3,369
Registered: 12/13/04
Re: BINGO THE EINSTEINIANO
Posted: Apr 3, 2013 5:48 PM
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Bingo the Einsteiniano teaches future Bingos to trap long trains inside short tunnels:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VSRIyDfo_mY

The only unresolved problem: Is the long train trapped inside the short tunnel IN A COMPRESSED STATE or not? Some Bingos say it is, others say it isn't:

http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/SR/barn_pole.html
"These are the props. You own a barn, 40m long, with automatic doors at either end, that can be opened and closed simultaneously by a switch. You also have a pole, 80m long, which of course won't fit in the barn. (...) If it does not explode under the strain and it is sufficiently elastic it will come to rest and start to spring back to its natural shape but since it is too big for the barn the other end is now going to crash into the back door and the rod will be trapped IN A COMPRESSED STATE inside the barn."

http://www.quebecscience.qc.ca/Revolutions
Stéphane Durand: "Ainsi, une fusée de 100 m passant à toute vitesse dans un tunnel de 60 m pourrait être entièrement contenue dans ce tunnel pendant une fraction de seconde, durant laquelle il serait possible de fermer des portes aux deux bouts! La fusée est donc réellement plus courte. Pourtant, il n'y a PAS DE COMPRESSION matérielle ou physique de l'engin."

Pentcho Valev




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