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Topic: Wish: Do not support the Sociopaths in "science" by, WITHOUT COMMENT, re-posting their vicious lies "about life" - Re: Scientists home in on mysterious dark matter
Replies: 1   Last Post: Apr 5, 2013 5:43 AM

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Leonardo Been

Posts: 21
Registered: 6/18/07
Wish: Do not support the Sociopaths in "science" by, WITHOUT COMMENT, re-posting their vicious lies "about life" - Re: Scientists home in on mysterious dark matter
Posted: Apr 5, 2013 5:43 AM
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My wish:

Do not support the Sociopaths in "science"
by, WITHOUT COMMENT, re-posting their vicious
lies "about life."

'


_______________________________________________________

On Fri, 05 Apr 2013 05:14:49 +0000, "Jai Maharaj" wrote:

> Scientists home in on mysterious dark matter
>
> ANI
> DNA
> Thursday, April 4, 2013
>
> Sometimes called the sculptor of the universe's millions of galaxies
> because of the way its gravity shapes their formation, its existence has
> long been recognised because of the way it pushes visible stars and
> planets around.
>
> Scientists said on Wednesday they may be close to tracking down the
> mysterious "dark matter" which makes up more than a quarter of the
> universe but has never been seen.
>
> A final identification of what makes up the enigmatic material would solve
> one of the biggest mysteries in physics and open up new investigations
> into the possibility of multiple universes and other areas, said
> researchers.
>
> Members of an international team had picked up what might be the first
> physical trace left by dark matter while studying cosmic rays recorded on
> the International Space Station, said the head of the Europe- and US-based
> research project Samuel Ting.
>
> He told a packed seminar at the CERN research centre, near Geneva, the
> team had found a surge of positron particles that might have come from
> dark matter. In the coming months, he said, the CERN-built AMS particle
> detector on the space station "will be able to tell us conclusively
> whether these positrons are a signal for dark matter or if they have some
> other origin".
>
> Dark matter, once the stuff of science fiction, "is one of the most
> important mysteries of physics today," Ting, a professor at the
> Massachusetts Institute of Technology and 1976 Nobel physics prize winner,
> has written. Sometimes called the sculptor of the universe's millions of
> galaxies because of the way its gravity shapes their formation, its
> existence has long been recognised because of the way it pushes visible
> stars and planets around.
>
> But efforts in laboratories on earth and in deep underground caverns to
> find concrete evidence that it is there, and to establish what it is, have
> so far proven fruitless. Ting said it was also possible the surges came
> from pulsars - rotating neutron stars that emit a pulsing radiation.
>
> But CERN physicist Pauline Gagnon said after hearing Ting that the
> precision of the AMS could make it possible "to get a first hold on dark
> matter really soon". "That would be terrific, like discovering a
> completely new continent. It would really open the door to a whole new
> world," said Gagnon, a Canadian physicist on ATLAS, one of the two CERN
> teams that believe they found evidence of the elusive Higgs particle in
> the centre's Large Hadron Collider.
>
> New Physics
>
> John Conway, a physics professor from the University of California, Davis,
> working at CERN, said a confirmed discovery would push scientists into
> uncharted realms of research.
>
> He said fresh insights could be gained into super- symmetry, a theory that
> says the current known 17 elementary particles have heavier but invisible
> counterparts, and dimensions beyond the currently known length, breadth
> and height, and time.
>
> Other scientists, especially cosmologists now trying to peer back beyond
> the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago, suggest identification of dark matter
> could give new clues to whether the universe itself is alone or one of
> many. New research could start at CERN's Large Hadron Collider when the
> vast machine resumes operations in early 2015.
>
> The huge subterranean complex running under the Franco- Swiss border at
> the foot of the Jura mountains was shut down in February to double its
> power and multiply the millions of "mini-Big Bang" particle collisions it
> can stage daily. Until last week, dark matter was thought to make up
> around 24% of the universe, with normal matter — galaxies, stars and
> planets - accounting for about 4.5%.
>
> But then the European Space Agency's Planck satellite team reported that
> mapping of echoes of the early cosmos showed dark matter made up 26.8
> percent and ordinary matter 4.9% — together the total of the material of
> the universe.
>
> The dominant constituent is the non-material "dark energy", as mysterious
> as dark matter and believed to be the driver of cosmic expansion.
>
> Continues at:
>
> http://www.dnaindia.com/scitech/1818835/report-scientists-home-in-on-mysterious-dark-matter
>
> Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
> Om Shanti
>
> http://groups.google.com/group/alt.fan.jai-maharaj
>
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