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Topic: "WORLD'S MOST PRODUCTIVE SCIENTISTS" LIST
Replies: 18   Last Post: Apr 27, 2013 2:52 AM

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Tom Potter

Posts: 497
Registered: 8/9/06
Re: "WORLD'S MOST PRODUCTIVE SCIENTISTS" LIST
Posted: Apr 26, 2013 5:11 AM
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"Graham Cooper" <grahamcooper7@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:c4f3de22-719d-46df-acf3-05184054fa0e@ua8g2000pbb.googlegroups.com...
On Apr 25, 4:53 pm, "Tom Potter" <tdp1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> >"Graham Cooper" <grahamcoop...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>> >-----------

>>
>> >USER FRIENDLY INTERFACE = HAPPY CUSTOMERS
>>
>> >=/= World Class Scientist
>>
>> >Herc
>>
>> Interesting!
>>
>> Why don't you explasin some of your equations?
>>
>> --
>> Tom Potter

>
>
>haha! There is no audience for new theories any more..
>
>Basically I use an entire equation as the ACCUMULATOR A
>
>LDA $1010
>STA $F0F0
>
>in a CONTEXTUAL SEARCH through a Table in RAM.
>
>This will speed up Logic Programming from Recursive Algorithms
>to Iterative Algorithms.
>
>E.g.
>
>eats (tom, big(mac) ).
>
>REF TERM
>1 eats
>21 tom
>221 big
>222 mac
>
>ON QUERY.ref=HEADS.ref AND QUERY.term=HEADS.term
>
>This SQL CLAUSE does the work of 100 lines of recursive code found in
>standard PROLOG Interpreters.
>
>Herc
>--
>www.BLoCKPROLOG.com


Would you explain that SLOWLY
so I can understand it?

It appears to me that you are using 8080 assembler,
PROLOG and SQL???

--
Tom Potter

http://the-cloud-machine.tk
http://tiny.im/390k







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